Thinking of getting a dog (1 Viewer)

sleepy

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don't get a rottweiler. my parents in law have an 18 month old rottweiler that they haven't trained properly, and covid 19 was a blessing, because it was actually beginning to cause tension where i was actually going to start refusing to call around to them.
it's not the dog's fault, to be fair.

We're not getting a Rottweiler
 

seanc

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They will get attached. When my nephews (about 5 and 7 as well) visited they accidentally acquired a neighbours pup. The pup followed them home. Every adult in the gaff was like "Now boys, I know you like the puppy, but he's not yours and we need to give him back to whoever owns him. The puppy must have a very sad mummy or daddy now that misses him". They said "Yes mum, yes uncle, yes dad, yes granny, yes grandad, we understand".

15 seconds later "So anyway, what will we name him? I wonder what his old owners named him."


Not knocking fostering, but kids are kids.
 

sleepy

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They will get attached. When my nephews (about 5 and 7 as well) visited they accidentally acquired a neighbours pup. The pup followed them home. Every adult in the gaff was like "Now boys, I know you like the puppy, but he's not yours and we need to give him back to whoever owns him. The puppy must have a very sad mummy or daddy now that misses him". They said "Yes mum, yes uncle, yes dad, yes granny, yes grandad, we understand".

15 seconds later "So anyway, what will we name him? I wonder what his old owners named him."


Not knocking fostering, but kids are kids.

That sounds like my kids. They've already gotten pretty attached to the neighbors cat.
 

Cormcolash

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Mate of mine had a good take on this. If in somewhere for instance like a shelter where you would have a choice between numerous dogs, pick the most quiet shy one. That dog will be chilled out and relatively easy to look after.

Lots of people pick the dog that will run up to them being all friendly tail wagging tongue lolling "Oh it's so cute look at it awwwww". That dog will demand constant attention and go mental at the sound of a door bell.
 

sleepy

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Mate of mine had a good take on this. If in somewhere for instance like a shelter where you would have a choice between numerous dogs, pick the most quiet shy one. That dog will be chilled out and relatively easy to look after.

Lots of people pick the dog that will run up to them being all friendly tail wagging tongue lolling "Oh it's so cute look at it awwwww". That dog will demand constant attention and go mental at the sound of a door bell.

That makes sense
 

eoinzy2000

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Getting a dog ourselves on Sunday. Had a dog years ago and spent time training. Its laborious. Advices for youngish family I have received is to go for something from pup, not rescued, as there an be issues. When you're in the swing of things in done years, you probably can try the rescue route. Apart from all the diligence required house training, an excellent piece of advice I received was to repeatedly lift the food bowl during feeding, and return in shortly after. This lets the dog know you are boss, and not to growl or snap when kids approach when eating etc. That's a common problem of any dog I come across
 

the_jen

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One thing I'm extremely glad we did was to train the dog to use one specific area of the garden for a toilet. If you have kids it's probably an even better idea, they can run around barefoot, sit anywhere, maybe eat herbs and fruit without pee on them.
 

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Pretty much spot on flashback.

They're pack animals. The family is the pack. The dog is the second or third most important member of the pack, in its own head.
They need to know who the alpha is.

You act like a dick, then either a) the dog will follow your lead and go mental
or b) the dog will instinctively realise you're not really in control, and so it'll take charge of the pack and go mental.

I think dog psychology is pretty straightforward, but hugely hugely important. And a good lesson for the younglings in their formative years.

Sleepy, you've got two kids. You can probably handle a dog.


edit: what unicron said.
Yeah.
My friend had an Alsatian growing up
Great family dog, great guard dog. They all loved it, it loved them.
Then they lost their Dad, lovely man.
Once the dog sussed this, it consistently would attack my friend - the only son - on sight. Like did some damage to him before he was pulled off.
They had to get rid of it. Made an already horrible situation even worse.
 

IFF

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My experience is that springer spaniels are crazy. Well a springer spaniel was crazy.
We had a springer spaniel while I still lived at home. She would bark at me just by entering rooms, or just for maintaining a sitting position. I could just be watching TV or listening to music, she would got really angry and bark.

Springer-collie Cross however was a really nice dog
 

Anthony

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We have a Beagle/Springer, very well behaved, affectionate but a bit smelly dog. The other is a Beagle, upity, selectively deaf, needy and stuburn. Both very good socially.
 

flashback

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They will get attached. When my nephews (about 5 and 7 as well) visited they accidentally acquired a neighbours pup. The pup followed them home. Every adult in the gaff was like "Now boys, I know you like the puppy, but he's not yours and we need to give him back to whoever owns him. The puppy must have a very sad mummy or daddy now that misses him". They said "Yes mum, yes uncle, yes dad, yes granny, yes grandad, we understand".

15 seconds later "So anyway, what will we name him? I wonder what his old owners named him."


Not knocking fostering, but kids are kids.


Yeah. I used to be out on the west coast a bit when I was a kid. Sometimes they'd put the puppies in a bag and drown them, but sometimes they'd take the pup way out onto the rocks at low tide, and leave it there.

Sure enough fucking eagle eyes here was off scouring the coast at low tide looking for crap, and I found a puppy. Brought him back, triumphant in the daily haul, and completely in love with this new puppy.

The Old man had to take the dog back off to the owners, who clearly didn't want it and were clearly going to kill it.

Yeah.
 

seanc

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Jeez, guys, I didn't want my post about the inherent love kids have for dogs to generate such downer posts. I mean, lovely stories, but very sad.

But while we're at it. We quickly tracked down the owner of the puppy my nephews acquired and drove down to give the pup back to him. He was a widower farmer whose own kids had left the nest long ago. This farmer had had three dogs, but one had died of old age a month earlier. The other had been hit by a car not long after. Then on this day, he went out to check something in the shed, and his one remaining dog ran off with my nephews.

The whole family went down to give the puppy back and show that we were really sorry about it all. The man nearly cried. And, you know, old farmers don't cry.

Also, the nephews knew they'd done something wrong by getting too attached to the dog, so they didn't understand why the farmer was being so nice to them when we returned the dog. I think it was the first time the boys felt something like shame or regret. Although there was also the fact that they couldn't understand a word the farmer was saying. "Arra shur jaysus tis mighty to get him back now altogether, pure mighty".



But hey, get a dog, show us pics.

Edit: the nephews have a dog of their own now. he instantly became part of their family.
 
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therealjohnny

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Seconding the food thing. Let them know from the start that you control the food, don't tolerate growling or snapping when you take the food away. Make them sit before feeding. They'll soon get the message.
 

GO

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My TOP TIPs are like someone already said..

first time out..get a pup..much easier to mould into a good boy
Never let the dog jump up on you..if he does turn your back on him for negative reenforcement. People HATE dogs that jump up on them.Well I do anyway
don't get a hard looking dog.We had one and even though he was literally the greatest dog ever to wag a tail..he intimidated people and thats not great
Get them addicted to BALL straightaway. Its the only way to be exercising a dog.Its fun for all the family
Go to training classes and get all this knowledge first hand. Money well spent

Ohh..and make sure the dog isnt deaf. My kid has a deaf dog and it is untrainable. hasnt a fucking clue whats going on
 

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