Fontaines DC (2 Viewers)

Scientician 0.8

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That Murder Capital song sounds good enough but huge bang of Shine III off it. It sounds like any of the rake of post-Smiths British indie bands of late '80s or early '90s, a lot of whom I liked.

I dunno if I posted above but I got pilloried on Twitter for chastising the Fontaines on their wankology in an interview about music in Dublin.

If you're not from Dublin and not a musician, maybe it's harder to see the join but Fontaines just ping me as privileged spoofers, as fake in their way as the Thrills of yore. I don't know what authenticity is or if it matters but plausibility I think does. Ronnie Drew was able to spoof being a true blue Dublin working class lad instead of a fairly humdrum south suburbanite by never, ever going out of character. He method acted his whole existence from the Dubliners on. I know a lot of people give Damien Dempsey grief but at his best he solves this conundrum admirably while creating songs that will likely outlive him.

Having said all the above I don't think Fontaines are without merit, just the swagger and fake streetiness of them puts me off, but who cares? I'm hardly their target audience am I?

I find it sad and strange that it is (finally) trendy to sing in an Irish accent but not necessarily your own voice, so you have people putting on these weirdly strained working class accents or whatever in order to sound more real.

I might be inadvertently guilty of it myself but I have to say, ever since I started writing and playing songs I just wanted to sound like me. Anyway my tweet below is the last thing I have to say on the Fontaines.

 

pete

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That Murder Capital song sounds good enough but huge bang of Shine III off it. It sounds like any of the rake of post-Smiths British indie bands of late '80s or early '90s, a lot of whom I liked.

I dunno if I posted above but I got pilloried on Twitter for chastising the Fontaines on their wankology in an interview about music in Dublin.

If you're not from Dublin and not a musician, maybe it's harder to see the join but Fontaines just ping me as privileged spoofers, as fake in their way as the Thrills of yore. I don't know what authenticity is or if it matters but plausibility I think does. Ronnie Drew was able to spoof being a true blue Dublin working class lad instead of a fairly humdrum south suburbanite by never, ever going out of character. He method acted his whole existence from the Dubliners on. I know a lot of people give Damien Dempsey grief but at his best he solves this conundrum admirably while creating songs that will likely outlive him.

Having said all the above I don't think Fontaines are without merit, just the swagger and fake streetiness of them puts me off, but who cares? I'm hardly their target audience am I?

I find it sad and strange that it is (finally) trendy to sing in an Irish accent but not necessarily your own voice, so you have people putting on these weirdly strained working class accents or whatever in order to sound more real.

I might be inadvertently guilty of it myself but I have to say, ever since I started writing and playing songs I just wanted to sound like me. Anyway my tweet below is the last thing I have to say on the Fontaines.

things i like best about that galtee ad: 1 the gasometer (RIP) and 2. what appears to be a shot of haddington road church - i don't think Ballsbridge, Dublin 4 was the mood they were after.
 

Scientician 0.8

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your own voice, or your own accent?

If the latter, Shane McGowan did that his whole life.

Great points about Ronnie Drew.
I mean is it more or less authentic to sing in an Irish accent that's not my own speaking accent than to sing in an English accent?

Shane McGowan gets a pass because diaspora and fantastic songwriter. Find it amazing the way Van Morrison meets an American drawl while still sounding Belfast.
 

ernesto

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I mean is it more or less authentic to sing in an Irish accent that's not my own speaking accent than to sing in an English accent?

Shane McGowan gets a pass because diaspora and fantastic songwriter. Find it amazing the way Van Morrison meets an American drawl while still sounding Belfast.
A lot of people from Derry have a slight American twang due to the US Naval base that was situated there and the introduction of jazz and swing into the area from lads on boats back in the day
 

Cornu Ammonis

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Ronnie Drew was able to spoof being a true blue Dublin working class lad instead of a fairly humdrum south suburbanite by never, ever going out of character.
See Andy Irvine’s song “O’Donoghues”:
Ronnie Drew in his fine suit of blue
And a voice like gravel that would cut you in two
We thought he was Dublin through and through
But he blew in from Dun Laoghaire

 

pete

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Is this where I post the clip of my uncle singing in O’Donoghues in 1968?




He’s the real deal.

edit to add this youtube clip & description


Before anyone starts thinking that Ted has the words wrong, Ted was the first ever to sing the song and he sang it as written by my Da, Donagh MacDonagh with a couple of verses thrown in by me. Christy Moore made all those changes and, in my opinion, except for "the bloody crown" they were all bad changes that hurt the song. I might ad that the first time the song was sung was at a memorial for my DA in the Abbey January 1968. This song, was written by my father, Donagh MacDonagh in 1963 and was pretty much immediately forgotten until I showed it to Ted McKenna in 1967 and he immediately glommed on to it. He first sang it at a memorial for my father at the Abbey in 1968 and was the first ever to record it in 1969. The song was originally named Dublin City (my fault, I think) but whoever renamed it did it a favor. A lot of people have recorded and sung the song since, 43 years later I still think Ted did the best job by far.
 
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Cornu Ammonis

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Is this where I post the clip of my uncle singing in O’Donoghues in 1968?




He’s the real deal.

edit to add this youtube clip & description

And Ted McKenna’s also mentioned in that same song:
David Smythe never short of a witty phrase
Sonny Brogan love the way he plays
Ted McKenna, God bless the days
Of Italian mandolinos
At closing time we didn’t go far
Just down the road to the Pike Coffee Bar
“The usual suspects; there you are!
Have yez no homes to go to?”
 

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