People who release music (1 Viewer)

ernesto

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@ernesto have you tried The GOO? Excellent free print mag run by John Brereton. Great vibe to it. Also Totally Dublin, Hot Press, etc.

Regarding airplay, what egg said. The likes of Nova Guestlist, also Dublin City FM, e.g. Paul McDermott, John Barker are predisposed to playing Irish stuff.

Yeah Niall McGuirk is supposedly reviewing the album for The Goo 🤷 but I've heard nowt
 

ernesto

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Just got word back from a reviewer we sent it to, for oct releases for totally Dublin, apparently it didn't make the cut.

Oh well.

Reckon I've enough info on this thread to fire off alot of emails over the weekend.
Cheers lads
 

sleepy

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Has anyone here had any experience of trying to submit their albums or eps to independent labels for release? We’re probably going to record an ep in a month or 2 and I don’t know if I want to go down the same route as I have with every other release we’ve done so far.
 

ann post

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Labels are in the position now (that i don't agree with) that you need to largely be autonomous and covering your PR/socials/production before they can take a punt on you, even if it is a label that's a labour of love. Like you nearly need to be putting them outta business.
 

Unicron

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Labels are in the position now (that i don't agree with) that you need to largely be autonomous and covering your PR/socials/production before they can take a punt on you, even if it is a label that's a labour of love. Like you nearly need to be putting them outta business.

Wouldn't necessarily object to the production aspect of it. At least the musician gets to exert control over the most important aspect of the thing. Would depend on the nature of the spit in the deal.

But if a label aren't bringing something to the table WRT to the promo and marketing, the things that aren't vital the making of music then what are they brining to the table?

You wouldn't hire a lawyer who insisted you represented yourself in court.
 

nuke terrorist

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selling 300 records of a DIY release is like having a platinum record.
I only buy the odd new release mostly because there's a huge amount of records being reissued that I want.
this has been a long standing problem for new bands.

most people I know who run labels have always done something like this:
they trade their releases (CD for CD, LP for LP etc.) with other labels. then they sell the inventory they build up through a mailorder distro or sometimes at gigs.
this works grand for cult genres but if you are doing something with more universal appeal, then I have no idea.

a large volume of great music has always been neglected. maybe that's why there's a big reissue culture now.
 

sleepy

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selling 300 records of a DIY release is like having a platinum record.
I only buy the odd new release mostly because there's a huge amount of records being reissued that I want.
this has been a long standing problem for new bands.

most people I know who run labels have always done something like this:
they trade their releases (CD for CD, LP for LP etc.) with other labels. then they sell the inventory they build up through a mailorder distro or sometimes at gigs.
this works grand for cult genres but if you are doing something with more universal appeal, then I have no idea.

a large volume of great music has always been neglected. maybe that's why there's a big reissue culture now.
All very good points.
I’d say some of the reasons that there’s a big reissues market is because the resurgence of vinyl. And also because there’s so much new music coming that people get kind of bamboozled by choice. It’s kind of hard to find time for everything so I think people end up just going with what they know they’ll definitely like.
 

ann post

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But if a label aren't bringing something to the table WRT to the promo and marketing, the things that aren't vital the making of music then what are they brining to the table?

I don't know.

But if you aren't making a stir on socials, in the current climate it's hard for them to make you interesting, and that's where people are at now.
 

nuke terrorist

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All very good points.
I’d say some of the reasons that there’s a big reissues market is because the resurgence of vinyl. And also because there’s so much new music coming that people get kind of bamboozled by choice. It’s kind of hard to find time for everything so I think people end up just going with what they know they’ll definitely like.
there's so much stuff that was never released before too - e.g. obscure film soundtracks, 'world music', demos etc.
having to listen to maybe 50 new artists to find one or two you like is a lot of work for little reward.
I got tired of that in the early 90's as a teen. the rise of social media really left me behind too.
 

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