Hellworld Thread (2 Viewers)

therealjohnny

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"..a new wood stove, fulfilling the strictest regulation we have and burning just one kilogramme of wood under optimal conditions, will pollute one million cubic metres of completely clean air up to the World Health Organization’s [new] guideline level.”
Tiny particle pollution – called PM2.5 – is especially harmful to health as it can pass through the lungs into the bloodstream and then be carried around the body and lodge in organs. At least 40 ,000 early deaths a year are attributed to wood burning in Europe.
Domestic wood burning is the single biggest source of PM2.5 air pollution in the UK, producing three times more pollution than road traffic. The situation is the same in the EU, with home stoves emitting about half of all PM2.5 and soot. Just 8% of the UK population uses wood burners and many are affluent people choosing a wood fire for aesthetic reasons, rather than to heat their home.
 

Lili Marlene

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"..a new wood stove, fulfilling the strictest regulation we have and burning just one kilogramme of wood under optimal conditions, will pollute one million cubic metres of completely clean air up to the World Health Organization’s [new] guideline level.”
Tiny particle pollution – called PM2.5 – is especially harmful to health as it can pass through the lungs into the bloodstream and then be carried around the body and lodge in organs. At least 40 ,000 early deaths a year are attributed to wood burning in Europe.
Domestic wood burning is the single biggest source of PM2.5 air pollution in the UK, producing three times more pollution than road traffic. The situation is the same in the EU, with home stoves emitting about half of all PM2.5 and soot. Just 8% of the UK population uses wood burners and many are affluent people choosing a wood fire for aesthetic reasons, rather than to heat their home.
The stove makers disagree and think it's all a plot by Big Open Fire to ruin their business


I haven't a clue but agree it's depressing
 

ann post

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They are taking the diesel/petrol at tailpipe too though -

Like trees fall down in the back yard and i cut them up and dry them and burn them
There isn't any american oil war, dead saudi journalists, crude oil mining, fracking, petrochemical byproduct industry or transport emmissions involved.

Though i fully understand that a wood fires are a bling fed by farmed kiln dried wood for most.
 

David Kronenbourg

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The stove makers disagree and think it's all a plot by Big Open Fire to ruin their business


I haven't a clue but agree it's depressing
Toast caused the PM 2.5 level to shoot up to 92 and well-done sausages peaked at 218. So are we going to ban sausages?

 

ann post

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Are kilns evil as well? ffs

WEelllll

They add layer of energy consumption into the drying process which makes wood as a product more uniform. They aren't the end of the world but considering wood can be sheltered and air dryed using sun and wind adding a massive kiln into the food chain seems a bit wasteful. A bit like washing dishes to put them in the dishwasher.
 

magicbastarder

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it'd be much clearer if the output was defined by average output per hour, rather than per unit energy.
for example, AFAIK, a decent wood stove is two to three times more efficient at converting the energy in the fuel into the desired output - approx 70-80% efficiency for a decent stove, and maybe about 30% efficiency for a diesel engine in a truck. so i'm curious if they mean input or output energy.

my usual whinge here (to assuage my middle class stove owning guilt) is in relation to open fires, i see houses often with fires burning that i would put money on are emitting at least 20 times as much PM as our stove is - when our stove gets going, you can barely see smoke coming from the chimney. and that issue - people burning shit fuel in open fires - is being (partly) addressed with the wet wood ban.

and as per ann post's post; most of what we burn is well seasoned wood scavenged rather than bought in; it'd rot down to produce CO2 anyway, so by burning it we're reducing what we burn in gas and thus our overall CO2 output.
 

magicbastarder

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WEelllll

They add layer of energy consumption into the drying process which makes wood as a product more uniform. They aren't the end of the world but considering wood can be sheltered and air dryed using sun and wind adding a massive kiln into the food chain seems a bit wasteful. A bit like washing dishes to put them in the dishwasher.
our routine is that we've a woodshed which was originally built as a coal bunker i suspect (1950s house so a likely reason); when i get fresh wood, i split it and leave it sitting on top of it for a year and let wind and sun do its bit, and then in the spring i move it all into the shed and let it dry further out of the elements.
 

ann post

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our routine is that we've a woodshed which was originally built as a coal bunker i suspect (1950s house so a likely reason); when i get fresh wood, i split it and leave it sitting on top of it for a year and let wind and sun do its bit, and then in the spring i move it all into the shed and let it dry further out of the elements.

I did a bit of measuring last night out of curiousity.
In the region of 6KG of wood to heat the place for the evening and through today a bit too, as the chimney breast tends to keep the place warm enough for the morning. Mostly writing that down here to extrapolate further info later
 

egg_

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anyone had any experience with those heat pump yokes?
Got a quote for one in our house, which is already reasonably well insulated and airtight (new build when we moved in in 2007). We'd have to replace all the radiators though, and that plus the heatpump itself were coming in around the 20 grand mark. That'd be minus the govt grant, but still it's a shitload of money.
 

flashback

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I've seen them in action and they're great, you'd need a new build though, they won't work on an old house unless you manage to seal the whole damn thing up.

How do you mean seal up? Like stop all the drafts in the house?
Got a quote for one in our house, which is already reasonably well insulated and airtight (new build when we moved in in 2007). We'd have to replace all the radiators though, and that plus the heatpump itself were coming in around the 20 grand mark. That'd be minus the govt grant, but still it's a shitload of money.
That's a fair amount alright. Hm. Seems like it's a bit more than an AC unit in the US, I was expecting it to be about the same.
 

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