What crop are you growing this year? (1 Viewer)

Lili Marlene

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I suppose i'll be a real farmer when i'm a bitter fuck about it but right now i'm optimistic.

What are you growing? What should I grow? What should I not grow? Come on, you don't all live in Finglas.


Tell me all your disaster stories about how it didn't work for you, insects ate it all, it's not worth doing and I should never try anything ever.
 

magicbastarder

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well, the garlic is in the ground and we're no doubt going to plant courgettes again, because when they hit their stride, they really lash them out.
i've been meaning to build a larger raised bed, must get the finger out on that front.
 

ann post

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We have some apple trees here that clearly have gone a year or two untended, need to work out what to do with them.

I do this with them, the apples aren't too nice for general eating.

edit -

I tried this year doubling all the quantities to make loads at once but i found I didn't really get the same heat density into it, works better doing them as they are here.
 

magicbastarder

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We have some apple trees here that clearly have gone a year or two untended, need to work out what to do with them.
IIRC you cut out any crossing branches, and make sure that plenty of air can get through the crown.
the problem with one of ours is that it's at a full 45 degree angle. i'm slowly trying to rectify that.
 

JohnnyRaz

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garden is a WWI battlefield after the extension was finished.
goal for this season is getting something resembling arable soil in most of it again.
the fruit bushes are unaffected, so at least we'll have them
 

ann post

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Spuds, put them in around st patricks day and do a little bit of checking on them every few weeks.
Rhubarb - not everyones faves but I use them for Jam, and sometimes flash fry them.
Leeks - for soup, with the spuds.
All these go well for me.

Tried carrots but the container was too small and they came out tiny.
 

egg_

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Mrs. egg_ normally buys her seeds at this time of year, she's not really sure whether she ought to this year seeing as she does most of the actual gardening, and she's still so fucked with covid :(

We're still eating last year's onions, spuds, parsnips, celeriac, squash, fennel, leeks and kale. Have blackberries, blackcurrants and a small few tomatoes in the freezer. Also some pickled cucumbers and some sauerkraut and fermented chillis. We have the odd bit of broccoli coming up atm, and we have salad leaves year-round. During the spring/summer/autumn we normally have peas, various beans, mangetout, chillis, courgettes, strawberries, raspberries, red and blackcurrants, artichokes, carrots, beetroots, cabbage, rhubarb. Probably some other stuff too - oh yeah sometimes we get a couple of figs and a melon or two.

We have really wet heavy soil, so everything (including the stuff in the polytunnel) is grown in raised beds. No success with apples - most of the trees we planted in 2006/2007 have fallen over, and any that haven't produce very little (but we gets lots from my mother-in-law's trees up the road). Thinking of cutting them all down and replanting just a few along one of the drains to try and keep its roots dry, and trying out a forest garden in what was the "orchard"
 

magicbastarder

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No success with apples - most of the trees we planted in 2006/2007 have fallen over, and any that haven't produce very little (but we gets lots from my mother-in-law's trees up the road). Thinking of cutting them all down and replanting just a few along one of the drains to try and keep its roots dry, and trying out a forest garden in what was the "orchard"
we have an apple variety called 'belvedere house' which is about halfway between a cooker and an eater. crops well, and its most distinguishing feature is that the flesh is bright pink. worth a go if you were looking to rejig the apples - we got it from irish seed savers.
 

Lili Marlene

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FYI all this growing takes a ferocious amount of work and time. Unless you really care about the quality of your food and genuinely enjoy the process of gardening then ... well, approach with caution

p.s. Also we have our own hens for eggs
I've been enjoying every second of it so far. I suppose I might be worn out in six months but finding that out is better than never knowing.
 

egg_

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I've been enjoying every second of it so far. I suppose I might be worn out in six months but finding that out is better than never knowing.
Heh well that's great, delighted to hear it dude :)

Highly recommend these books Books - Green Vegetable Seeds and also any of Charles Dowding's No-Dig stuff. And sure while you're at it you may as well get John Seymour's book on Self-Sufficiency - it's not really very useful in a practical sense, but it's a classic and a great oul read
 

flashback

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I'm not planting anything in the allotment this year (obviously), but last year I realised it's all about the soil, test the soil and fertilize properly. These crop plants aren't like ordinary plants at all, they like to be spoiled rotten.

If you can get a trailer of horse manure or something that's handy. If you can get 2 that's better, etc. Even if you don't do anything at all with it, you can just leave it and it will break down, or you can grow spuds directly in it.

If your soil is sodden, see if you can get the chippings of a deciduous tree, or even just logs can be buried and they act as a sponge kind of. You can look up Hugelkultur I think.

You never want to have bare soil, always have something going on, even if you're not growing food you can buy bulk seed for "green manure" and have the soil active.

If you're infested with weeds and you want to knock them back you can just go in with a rake of cardboard, trample everything down, lay down the cardboard, then I'd normally dump about 12 inches of woodchips on top to hold everything down. (And then dump a bag of blood fish and bone fert or whatever into that.)

I'm not sure if it's too late for garlic, normally I'd put that in during the autumn but it might be ok. Other than that I'd be thinking about cover crops, green manure, weed control and fertilizing and soil prep around now.

I dunno if it's all that different in Ireland. I suppose I'll be finding out soon enough.
 

flashback

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I have grown one tomato
It's sort of unfair in Ireland.

In warmer weather places you've got tomatoes coming up like weeds. I'd be pulling tomatoes out the paths in my allotment. There'd be so much tomatoes on the plants that just sprang up they'd be toppling over.

In Ireland, unless you're using a poly tunnel or something I suppose, it's a different deal I think. In my gaff I had a pile of tomatoes, chilie peppers, and basil growing, and you'd not keep up with it.

Then a skunk hid in there, and died, and it smelled like burning tyres, and that was the end of that for about 6 months. But, my point is, you might not be on a level playing field there.
 

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