What Book Did You Read Last Night??? (2 Viewers)

Cornu Ammonis

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irr. app. (ext.) did three full albums inspired by Reich and the orgone accumulator too. Evidently it is rich pickings, creatively. I wonder can I turn my hot press into one?
 

chris d

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The Man in the High Castle (1962) - at least the second time reading this. Fly through the first half, then it gets to be a real slog. Once the American's start their jewellery business I really lose interest. Because I'm thick probably.

Some Freebies

Treasure Island (1883) - Good craic. I think I was drunk reading the end because I had to Wiki it a few weeks later.

The Time Machine (1895) - Yeah, fine. Is this the first time travel story?
 

Cornu Ammonis

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The Man in the High Castle (1962) - at least the second time reading this. Fly through the first half, then it gets to be a real slog. Once the American's start their jewellery business I really lose interest. Because I'm thick probably.
Or because PKD is massively overrated? He had good ideas but didn't know how to finish a story.

The Time Machine (1895) - Yeah, fine. Is this the first time travel story?
No but it's probably the first one that cements it in the form we recognise (a dedicated machine to go back in time). There were a few in a similar vein in the 1800s, possibly even one or two earlier than that and there are arguments that fantasy stories where the protagonist falls asleep for years and years are time travel stories. I'm not so sure about that personally, I think they're different enough to be something else. I think HG Wells even wrote another book about time travel before this? I'm not an expert on Wells though.

There are definitely examples of books set in the far future (Dante's Divine Comedy was set a few decades into the future in order to put people he knew into the afterlife) and Mary Shelley's Last Man is set in the 21st century (it's shit though). Not time travel but at least in that speculative vein.
 

rettucs

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Bought these the other day

- Sinead O'Conor: Rememberings
- Kristen Hersh: Seeing Sideways
- Chris Franz: David Byrne is a bollox
- Tracey Thorn: My Rock 'n' Roll Friend.

3/4s the way through Rememberings. An entertaining read. On a scale of shite to good, its grand.

Looking forward to getting through this batch.
 

snakybus

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The Man in the High Castle (1962) - at least the second time reading this. Fly through the first half, then it gets to be a real slog. Once the American's start their jewellery business I really lose interest. Because I'm thick probably.

Some Freebies

Treasure Island (1883) - Good craic. I think I was drunk reading the end because I had to Wiki it a few weeks later.

The Time Machine (1895) - Yeah, fine. Is this the first time travel story?
I like PKD but I didn't really enjoy High Castle. I think he did actually know how to finish a book, though, and he had lots of good stuff that's more enjoyable/satisfying than this one, in my opnion. I don't think he's overrated -- just his name is associated with slick movies that turn out to be nothing like his rather nerdy, eccentric books. If anything that's cynical branding and not PKD's fault.

Treasure Island is stonking.

I never thought the TIme Machine was that amazing. Felt a bit proto-sci fi and corny, although it was quite fun. I know that's sacrilege, but anyway. The film with Samantha Mumba was mental.
 

Cornu Ammonis

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I like PKD but I didn't really enjoy High Castle. I think he did actually know how to finish a book, though, and he had lots of good stuff that's more enjoyable/satisfying than this one, in my opnion. I don't think he's overrated -- just his name is associated with slick movies that turn out to be nothing like his rather nerdy, eccentric books. If anything that's cynical branding and not PKD's fault.
What PKD would you rate? I’ve read High Castle, Electric Sheep and A Glass Darkly and didn’t particularly get much from any of them. The only PKD-related movie I’ve seen is the Blade Runner sequel.
 

snakybus

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What PKD would you rate? I’ve read High Castle, Electric Sheep and A Glass Darkly and didn’t particularly get much from any of them. The only PKD-related movie I’ve seen is the Blade Runner sequel.
Really, so you haven't seen the first Bladerunner but you saw the second? I've only read a few of his books but I actually liked Electric Sheep quite a bit. A Scanner Darkly was pretty good overall, I thought, though maybe a bit boring here and there. I think Ubik was my favourite, though it was pretty high on the inaccessible-PKD scale. In general, I find his writing just hard to come to terms with though, so I can see why it wouldn't resonate. I still don't think I quite get it. It's often stilted and his sense of humour is confusing -- you wonder if he's trying to be funny or if he was just on acid or something. I wonder if at the time they came out and the whole California hippy scene etc, would you get the feel for it more. And I guess if you're used to a more classic humorist like Vonnegut or an excellent stylist like Steinbeck (as other US, post-Hemingway white men) he can come across as just a pulpy weirdo, or second rate. But I like his ideas and his stories do engage me. His early short stories are lots of fun.
 

egg_

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Treasure Island (1883) - Good craic. I think I was drunk reading the end because I had to Wiki it a few weeks later.
Probably the book that I've read most often, fucking love it. Read it to my eldest when she was about 8 - once I'd finish a page she'd say "ok very good dad, now what did that all mean" and then I'd have to explain it to her in normal English. Pretty sure I read it myself when I was about the same age, I guess I'm just brainier than my children
 

Cornu Ammonis

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Really, so you haven't seen the first Bladerunner but you saw the second?
It was on TV one night and my wife wanted to watch it. I’ve always meant to watch the original but haven’t managed it. I keep an eye out for it on TV but it’s never on. Strikes me as the kind of thing Film4 should show from time to time but no dice.

I thought A Scanner Darkly was awful, it struck me as a bad take on Burroughs with its drugs-meets-dystopia vibes. I never got the impression that there was any humour in it, or indeed in anything I’ve read by him. Then again, most of the “hilarious” books of the 20th century are woeful by my reckoning (see A Confederacy of Dunces, Cold Comfort Farm, Lucky Jim, etc.). Being pulpy isn’t an issue for me, but I think I’m more Weird Tales than whatever PKD is classed as.
 

Cormcolash

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Probably the book that I've read most often, fucking love it. Read it to my eldest when she was about 8 - once I'd finish a page she'd say "ok very good dad, now what did that all mean" and then I'd have to explain it to her in normal English. Pretty sure I read it myself when I was about the same age, I guess I'm just brainier than my children
I read it around that age, 7 or 8, and I got it and I liked it too - but I haven't read it since haha. Kind of wouldn't mind going through it again.
 

snakybus

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It was on TV one night and my wife wanted to watch it. I’ve always meant to watch the original but haven’t managed it. I keep an eye out for it on TV but it’s never on. Strikes me as the kind of thing Film4 should show from time to time but no dice.

I thought A Scanner Darkly was awful, it struck me as a bad take on Burroughs with its drugs-meets-dystopia vibes. I never got the impression that there was any humour in it, or indeed in anything I’ve read by him. Then again, most of the “hilarious” books of the 20th century are woeful by my reckoning (see A Confederacy of Dunces, Cold Comfort Farm, Lucky Jim, etc.). Being pulpy isn’t an issue for me, but I think I’m more Weird Tales than whatever PKD is classed as.
Hmm, I think we probably have different tastes. I loved A Confederacy of Dunces. Lucky Jim I thought was pretty decent, if not laugh-out-loud funny. But there you go. (I've not read Cold Comfort Farm.)
 

rettucs

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Bought these the other day

- Sinead O'Conor: Rememberings

3/4s the way through Rememberings. An entertaining read. On a scale of shite to good, its grand.
downgrading my review from 'grand' to 'not great'.

Given what we already know about her, I figured it'd be more interesting. Its fine to pass the time, and you'd get through it in a single sitting if you were so inclined, but I guess I expected more.

A lot of mad stuff in her life was played out quite publicly on social media over the years. Some of the stuff she says in her book directly contradicts some of the mad stuff that happened - unless it didn't happen.

Its probably worth the read for the Prince chapter.
 

David Kronenbourg

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Unrelated question , has anyone ever read Frazer's The Golden Bough? I feel like I need a proper study guide or lecture series to help explain it to me because I never did classics and I haven't a clue what's being referenced 99% of the time. It's such a foundational text though that I feel like I should struggle through.

Just got a copy of this. Excited to delve in
 

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