Unpopular Opinions (1 Viewer)

JohnnyRaz

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Sep 3, 2004
Messages
6,059
Location
drifting arround
Is that Italian greasy spoon/cafe there on Capel Street? I had a memorable meal one miserable hungover day of egg and chips and a glass of milk. Possibly the best meal I've ever had. I think about it often
I’m with an earlier poster that capel are proximity to actual northside Dubliners will probably save it from turning into south William st - but we’ll see. It has long been my favourite street now yhat most of the city that isn’t actually dangerous and decrepit (talbot st) has been largely either gentrified or turned into an outdoot shopping center or tourist pub
 

magicbastarder

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
9,803
Website
stroma.org
the main article in the weekend section of the irish times is about how dublin feels unsafe now. my wife got the luas from smithfield to spencer dock on thursday and vowed not to make that mistake again.
 

nuke terrorist

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Dec 21, 2004
Messages
3,482
Location
'north munster'
RTE should have a station just for parenting issues
The amount of programmes on the radio with dedicated pieces about child-rearing and schools and whatever-else, is never fecking ending
There's an underlying assumption that kids and parenting are some natural state for everyone. It is not.
I presume there are more single people than active parents ( i do not need facts) but listening to RTE you'd think everyone had a batch of sniveling youngsters at home

Parenting is shit and boring and expensive and hard work. Stop fucking telling us about this awful fucking slow death!

LIsten, all your kids are very lovely and all. But also, no one else gives a good goddamn about them.


You know the joke about 'how can you tell someone is a vegan?' - 'don't worry, they'll tell you'
Holy heck is this hyper true about parents.

Parents, and particularly the parents at Montrose, think this is an interesting topic. It is the least interesting topic there is.
this is the type of thing I'd like see more i.e. someone giving a minority opinion to a very one sided debate.
I've never heard someone described as a proud non parent.

I usually tell folks I am a vegan in tandem with saying I worked on a pig farm part time aged 14-17.
my father was a pig farmer (usually manager) and I would now say I bullied into continuing after I was 15
by both folks, I was actually a vegan in the last month at the piggery.
i told my folks I was depressed and they still didn't get it - they're grand now though.
 

Cormcolash

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 20, 2002
Messages
24,183
Location
THIS IS SPARTA!!!
Website
geocities.com
the main article in the weekend section of the irish times is about how dublin feels unsafe now. my wife got the luas from smithfield to spencer dock on thursday and vowed not to make that mistake again.
You should try walking down North Lotts during the afternoon these days. It's literally like Hamsterdam from The Wire.
 

nuke terrorist

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Dec 21, 2004
Messages
3,482
Location
'north munster'
Until the pandemic began, I knew almost nothing about this existing but the debate on the surrogacy issue in Ireland is so extremely one sided and is out of kilter with the situation in European countries outside the former USSR.

I have always fully supported the rights of Gay, Lesbian, Trans, single people, the unmarried etc. to adopt children.
Abortion rights are a fundamental human right which should never be under question.

The Irish media especially RTE need to stop reporting on surrogacy or have a proper debate on the issue.

In Ireland surrogacy is unregulated.

In most EU / European countries as stated above, surrogacy is illegal (Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Serbia , Austria, Suisse, Norway, Finland, Turkey, Moldova) or only allowed for altruistic purposes (Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Greece, Hungary, Portugal).
Portugal tried to fully legalise surrogacy a few times but it was declared unconstitutional.

Poland, Sweden, Czech, Lithuania and Latvia are among the countries where there isn't clear guidance and up to date legislation is needed not disimilar to Ireland in some cases.


Surrogacy is legal in nearly all former USSR states not previously mentioned.

Also there are issues on EU definitions of human rights, particularly paying for the use of someone's body.

Ireland has very strict laws on sex work and paying for sex is illegal.
When those laws were being debated RTE gave women on both sides of the argument plenty of speaking time,

Paying a poor young woman far away from Ireland for the use of her body for 9 months and potentially putting her life at risk, doesn't seem to bother RTE - even if the reporters are women.

Paying 50- 60,000 to get a baby is only for the upper middle class or the rich.

IMO the options for legislation involve:
- Firstly, normalising the status of existing parents of surrogate children and giving them full parental rights.
- Going forward, surrogacy should be made illegal or if not, the whole process has to happen within Ireland.
But farming it out to other countries has to stop - this route should never have been open.


Ukraine only allows straight married couples to go through the process there.

I caught the end of a Late Late Show a few years ago where a gay couple with three children were defending surrogacy in an unchallenging piece where they cited homphobia and brought on their kids who they claimed were stigmatised.
Homophobia isn't an issue in my criticism and the kids deserve all respect but the rich parents don't.


Finally in a related issue, it is common for sperm donors to father 200 children. Why would someone want their child to have 200 siblings? Why???

I see this as a classic example of parents having huge privileges and their children having little or none.
 

JohnnyRaz

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Sep 3, 2004
Messages
6,059
Location
drifting arround
Until the pandemic began, I knew almost nothing about this existing but the debate on the surrogacy issue in Ireland is so extremely one sided and is out of kilter with the situation in European countries outside the former USSR.

I have always fully supported the rights of Gay, Lesbian, Trans, single people, the unmarried etc. to adopt children.
Abortion rights are a fundamental human right which should never be under question.

The Irish media especially RTE need to stop reporting on surrogacy or have a proper debate on the issue.

In Ireland surrogacy is unregulated.

In most EU / European countries as stated above, surrogacy is illegal (Germany, France, Spain, Italy, Serbia , Austria, Suisse, Norway, Finland, Turkey, Moldova) or only allowed for altruistic purposes (Belgium, Holland, Denmark, Greece, Hungary, Portugal).
Portugal tried to fully legalise surrogacy a few times but it was declared unconstitutional.

Poland, Sweden, Czech, Lithuania and Latvia are among the countries where there isn't clear guidance and up to date legislation is needed not disimilar to Ireland in some cases.


Surrogacy is legal in nearly all former USSR states not previously mentioned.

Also there are issues on EU definitions of human rights, particularly paying for the use of someone's body.

Ireland has very strict laws on sex work and paying for sex is illegal.
When those laws were being debated RTE gave women on both sides of the argument plenty of speaking time,

Paying a poor young woman far away from Ireland for the use of her body for 9 months and potentially putting her life at risk, doesn't seem to bother RTE - even if the reporters are women.

Paying 50- 60,000 to get a baby is only for the upper middle class or the rich.

IMO the options for legislation involve:
- Firstly, normalising the status of existing parents of surrogate children and giving them full parental rights.
- Going forward, surrogacy should be made illegal or if not, the whole process has to happen within Ireland.
But farming it out to other countries has to stop - this route should never have been open.


Ukraine only allows straight married couples to go through the process there.

I caught the end of a Late Late Show a few years ago where a gay couple with three children were defending surrogacy in an unchallenging piece where they cited homphobia and brought on their kids who they claimed were stigmatised.
Homophobia isn't an issue in my criticism and the kids deserve all respect but the rich parents don't.


Finally in a related issue, it is common for sperm donors to father 200 children. Why would someone want their child to have 200 siblings? Why???

I see this as a classic example of parents having huge privileges and their children having little or none.
I’m also hugely uncomfortable with the whole surrogacy area (regardless of identity of the parents). Agree that the complex ethical/legal/moral components rarely get an airing. Renting a womb in a poorer country just seems like another form of economic exploitation
 

nuke terrorist

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Dec 21, 2004
Messages
3,482
Location
'north munster'
The donor might not necessarily see them as his kids.

The resultant children may not see the others as siblings.
It completely depends on the individual but 200 is a lot of folks to not take into consideration.

There should be a limit on how many women a man can donate sperm to - 20 max.
there are a lot of issues with reproductive science and they are not being addressed.

And more generally, a lot people seem to make life changing decisions without due diligence.
 

ann post

Well-Known Member
Joined
Oct 13, 2002
Messages
25,108
Solutions
1
Location
Internment Explorer sp3
I can't see a hardware store for example lasting too long on a pedestrianised st.

How long before people start talking about the way the sex shops are lowering the tone.

I think any bulk/heavy item store is by defualt banished to m50 proximity at this point.

Bit of a look at capel st on google maps and it seems to be bookies, food places, pubs, newsagents*

*i suspect this word is reduntant too.

One thing you notice in the sticks more than dublin is that orbital shopping centres turn the innards of towns into rubble unless the towns are wildly proactive (see westport), and if you don't adapt you leave people living among ruins (see most towns on the n17). Nobody is going to capel street for a big shop or a set of armchairs or some of that rattan crap to decompose in their back gardens. The reason to go to cities in the traditional sense is in decline - you'd go for the variety, and you still get that with gigs and social in dublin, but for the rest variety is inevitably hoovered up by 4-5 chain stores.

I'm not sure i'd ever in my life drive to dublin just so i can drive down capel street, but i might eat there.
I do agree that it'll be a hummus jedward style place soon enough, but i don't think it's really in need of cars to sustain it's current setup either.
 

therealjohnny

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
Nov 1, 2002
Messages
35,115
Solutions
3
I think any bulk/heavy item store is by defualt banished to m50 proximity at this point.

Bit of a look at capel st on google maps and it seems to be bookies, food places, pubs, newsagents*

*i suspect this word is reduntant too.

One thing you notice in the sticks more than dublin is that orbital shopping centres turn the innards of towns into rubble unless the towns are wildly proactive (see westport), and if you don't adapt you leave people living among ruins (see most towns on the n17). Nobody is going to capel street for a big shop or a set of armchairs or some of that rattan crap to decompose in their back gardens. The reason to go to cities in the traditional sense is in decline - you'd go for the variety, and you still get that with gigs and social in dublin, but for the rest variety is inevitably hoovered up by 4-5 chain stores.

I'm not sure i'd ever in my life drive to dublin just so i can drive down capel street, but i might eat there.
I do agree that it'll be a hummus jedward style place soon enough, but i don't think it's really in need of cars to sustain it's current setup either.
I used to there intentionally to check out the charity shops. I visited the army surplus store and the various hardware shops a lot. There's also a music shop where'd I'd buy strings and plecs. There's a popular music shop specialising in trad instruments. Other specialist shops include the catering industry place, a petshop and the sex shops. Then there's the bars including Nealons and Pantibar. It has a lot going for it. For now.
 

Deadmanposting

Well-Known Member
Supporter
Joined
May 16, 2012
Messages
1,296
There was a real joy in driving to Capel St and doing ninja parking hunting on the backstreets like Arran Street and Little Strand St, Little Britain St with loops back around Capel St etc.

All these things will be lost, like tears in the rain
 

magicbastarder

Well-Known Member
Joined
Sep 14, 2006
Messages
9,803
Website
stroma.org
whatever became of that story about utopia catching fire and the owner running in to rescue a couple of hundred grand in cash from the basement?

edit: it was nirvana, a head shop, but it was owned by the same lad who owned utopia.
 

Users who are viewing this thread

21 Day Calendar

Bob Mould
Whelans
25 Wexford St, Portobello, Dublin 2, D02 H527, Ireland
The Bobby Lees - midnight at Whelan's
Whelans
25 Wexford St, Portobello, Dublin 2, D02 H527, Ireland
Einstürzende Neubauten
National Concert Hall
Earlsfort Terrace, Saint Kevin's, Dublin, Ireland
Big Brave (Southern Lord) + Percolator
Bello Bar
1 Portobello Harbour, Saint Kevin's, Dublin, Ireland
Lori Goldston - Droichead Arts Centre
Droichead Arts Centre
Stockwell Ln, Downtown Drogheda, Drogheda, Co. Louth, Ireland
Pixies
Iveagh Gardens
Stable Ln, Saint Kevin's, Dublin, Ireland

Latest Activity

Loading…

Support thumped.com

Support thumped.com and upgrade your account

Upgrade your account now to disable all ads... If we had any... Which we don't right now.

Upgrade now

Latest posts

Trending Threads

Latest threads

Top