Trekking Glaciers - haven't got a stitch to wear (1 Viewer)

MDR

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I'm going to Patagonia in September and we'll be doing some of the easier trekking on glaciers - it's walking rather than trekking. The gore-tex gear (shoes, jackets) is really expensive so can anyone advise me on what i will actually need for that sort of thing?

Thanks
 

Phat Pearson

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I'm going to Patagonia in September and we'll be doing some of the easier trekking on glaciers - it's walking rather than trekking. The gore-tex gear (shoes, jackets) is really expensive so can anyone advise me on what i will actually need for that sort of thing?

Thanks

I was on the Franz Joseph glacier in new Zealand. They just recommended to bring some form of hiking boots (I got some before I left for less than 100euro). Then when we got there they gave us crampons/spikes and all that jazz.

Any type of robust outdoor shoes should cut it.
 

Wilbert

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I'm going to Patagonia in September and we'll be doing some of the easier trekking on glaciers - it's walking rather than trekking. The gore-tex gear (shoes, jackets) is really expensive so can anyone advise me on what i will actually need for that sort of thing?

Thanks
So this is where the royalties for The Herring & The Brine are going! You should reinvest that money in this country, Ro, not Patagonia!

You're as bad as U2, shipping all of their cash off the Holland!
 

MDR

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I was on the Franz Joseph glacier in new Zealand. They just recommended to bring some form of hiking boots (I got some before I left for less than 100euro). Then when we got there they gave us crampons/spikes and all that jazz.

Any type of robust outdoor shoes should cut it.

The man in the shop said that you need special boots that have a lip at the heel which you can attach the crampons to - did you have those or just normal boots?

Thanks
 

MDR

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So this is where the royalties for The Herring & The Brine are going! You should reinvest that money in this country, Ro, not Patagonia!

You're as bad as U2, shipping all of their cash off the Holland!
Glacier-hiking is tax-deductable provided your music is deeply unpopular.
 

flashback

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Trekking on glaciers is not that cold. Funnily enough. I have plenty of photos of me on various glaciers wearing a t shirt.
Where you are going though the weather is extremely changeable. Storms blow in off Antarctica and cling to the Andes as they spin up SA. So.. you will need to have something warm.

In order of importance :

The best jacket I ever bought, by miles really, was a Buffalo.
http://www.militarykit.com/product_categories/jackets_buffalo.htm

I have the mountain shirt:




although its getting a bit tired at this point.

The GoreTex is really good for certain conditions, but if I was going back, I would probably just bring the Buffalo unless I was going higher than 4000meters.

It can be hard to get your hands on Buffaloes since the UK military buy basically all of them, but you can hunt them down here and there. They are worth the extra few quid compared to normal Pertex Pile. The UK army knows what its doing with that piece of gear.

No 2;
Lowe Alpine Mountain cap;


They look silly, but they are amazing. No matter how lashed on you are, and rough everything gets, your head will be dry and warm in this yoke.

No 3;
Long sleeve cycling jersey / runners top.
Something tight, and quick drying to wear under the buffalo. I used cycling jerseys because I knew them, and had them. Just something similar is good. Get short sleeve ones too I suppose. Dont wear cotton t shirts. They just get wet and stay wet and chill the shit out of you.

No 4
Cheap CoolMax etc white socklets. Just buy a package of those cheap runners socklet things. Change them every hour or whatever if its wet. Try and keep your feet dry and warm. I only brought three pairs thick hiking socks, and a rake of sockies, and just kept cycling through them with the same outside real sock on.

No 5;
Decent pair of glasses. I use Briko's because I am a gheylord cyclist, but, the cycling glasses work very well, and Brikos fit me much better than other ones. There is no need to get something too mental, just decent, covering glasses that stay on in really windy conditions.

No 6;
I used runners shorts for almost all the time. I had a couple of pairs. Then cycling leggings, and a pair of light, lined, breathable, leggings. I got imitation GoreTex. They werent that great, but, meh, they are kacks. Your legs take care of themselves really.


No 7;
I had these little tight gloves. They were really tough, almost like the gloves I wore on building sites, but warm.

Down there you will be exposed to a lot of -
Rain showers / storms. They come out of nowhere and hammer you, and then piss off. You need the buffalo. Need it. That's by far the first recommendation. You wont be perfectly dry in that, or anything, but you will be warm.
If you have the waterproof leggings you can whip them on, and have them so the rain doesnt run down your legs into your boots, have them so they drain over your boots.
Also, buy a rucksack cover, a waterproof one. I dont give a fuck what your Rucksack says, it is fucking not waterproof. Get a cover, with straps.

Wind. Its unbelievably windy there.
Thats why you need fitting glasses, and straps on your rucksack cover and hat. Stuff just get blown off you.

Sun, obviously. But, like, just be aware that on glaciers you are getting a double helping. Its bouncing up at you, as well as down onto you. Put sun block under your chin and nose as well as on your forehead ears etc. Wear glasses. The brightness of walking on snow / ice all day can hurt your eyes.
 

flashback

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oh yeah...
boots.

So, I am fond of thick, old skool, full grain leather walking boots.
The rocks out there are very sharp and new. They will cut.
If I was going there again... I would get a pair of boots, full grain leather, semi rigid sole (3/4s shank) with a rubber toe cover. Like, the ones where the leather is protected over the toe.

But, the whole world now seems intent on these fucking awful split leather, suedey leatherette boot things, with GoreTex liners. I mean... I guess. The GoreTex works in boots for a while. Its grand. I just like full grain leather.
Get used to walking in the semi rigid boot if you get one, you will need to exercise certain calf muscles. In the long run they make your life easier.

I dont really care about makes of boots, although Zamberlan are good.


This boot hasnt got that toe wrapper thing, but its on the right lines.

The above crossed with this

would be perfect.
Look at that toe wrapper stuff. Deadly for not slicing the shit out of your boots.
I would even say that its more important to get that toe wrapper than the full grain leather, because if you slice open your boot you will be in bother.
Having said that... full grain wont really slice open.
Tough call.
 

flashback

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oh yeah, last post I swear,
Rucksack : I like Lowe Alpine's bigger bags, they usually get the job done. I used the "Cerro Torre" aptly enough. (I saw the Cerro Torre too.)
But, bring a thick needle, and the thickest thread you can find. I borrowed Israeli military thread of some of the ex military types out there o patch things, like my bag.

Sleeping bag, down vrs synthetic, I would go with synthetic again. It's just too hard to keep your gear perfectly dry. Prima loft bags are pretty decent.

Get a mini RidgeRest, they are great for sitting on even if you are not sleeping on it.

If you are wanting a stove, I love my Mountain Safety Research (MSR) "Dragonfly".
 

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