Tour de France 2007 thread (2 Viewers)

rettucs

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Post of the week winner: 22nd March, 2013
I'm sure you'll be all over this, Nuke, but



before brits had systematic doping, they had the odd doper (Simpson, etc), and only one or 2 big name cyclists from back in the day. I was only familiar with Robinson from hearing Duffield going on about him. I know almost nothing about him other than the name. But anyway.
 

nuke terrorist

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Yeah - Brian Robinson and Tony Hoar were first Brits to finish Tour in 1955.
Brian won two Tour stages and the 1961 Dauphine.
He was a pundit for a day on Eurosport in James Richardson's time
Louise, his daughter, was a MB rider.
RIP.
A big piece of British cycling history gone
 

nuke terrorist

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I had the same impressions of Brian Robinson as Ned Boulting did. A good man who had the toughness to go where no one had succeded before

After decades of only the odd brave soul even trying. Brian Robinson (29th) and lantern rouge Tony Hoar (1932-2019) arrived in Paris as the first Brits to finish the Tour in 1955. Only 55 finished.
As David Duffield often said in his Eurosport commentary he and a pal cycled over to Paris for the finish when they realised two of their boys were going to make it.
It was the start of big things for Brian and soon the likes of Shay Elliot and Tom Simpson were following in his tracks.

When Robinson won his landmark first Tour stage in 1958 he actually finished second in a two man sprint. But having been nearly put into the barriers by Italian Arigo Padovan (a winner of multiple Tour and Giro stages who is still alive aged 95) Robinson was given the win. He said his first thought was that he was certain of a good contract for next season.
Cycling historian and filmmaker Ray Pascoe tells the story of Robinson's second Tour stage win from 1959. He won by 20 minutes!

In 1961 Robinson won the Dauphine. Other career highlights included 3rd in San Remo behind Catalan great Miguel Poblet in 1957. 8th in the Vuelta and 14th at the Tour both in 1956 were his best GT GC results.
After cycling Brian worked as a builder. Brian suffered major injuries after being hit by a car while out on a ride aged 83.
His daughter Louise (b.1965) was a Worlds cyclo cross medalist and MTB Olympian.
Once asked to describe herself in three words Louise Robinson said: ''I'm from Yorkshire''.

 

rettucs

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I had the same impressions of Brian Robinson as Ned Boulting did. A good man who had the toughness to go where no one had succeded before

After decades of only the odd brave soul even trying. Brian Robinson (29th) and lantern rouge Tony Hoar (1932-2019) arrived in Paris as the first Brits to finish the Tour in 1955. Only 55 finished.
As David Duffield often said in his Eurosport commentary he and a pal cycled over to Paris for the finish when they realised two of their boys were going to make it.
It was the start of big things for Brian and soon the likes of Shay Elliot and Tom Simpson were following in his tracks.

When Robinson won his landmark first Tour stage in 1958 he actually finished second in a two man sprint. But having been nearly put into the barriers by Italian Arigo Padovan (a winner of multiple Tour and Giro stages who is still alive aged 95) Robinson was given the win. He said his first thought was that he was certain of a good contract for next season.
Cycling historian and filmmaker Ray Pascoe tells the story of Robinson's second Tour stage win from 1959. He won by 20 minutes!

In 1961 Robinson won the Dauphine. Other career highlights included 3rd in San Remo behind Catalan great Miguel Poblet in 1957. 8th in the Vuelta and 14th at the Tour both in 1956 were his best GT GC results.
After cycling Brian worked as a builder. Brian suffered major injuries after being hit by a car while out on a ride aged 83.
His daughter Louise (b.1965) was a Worlds cyclo cross medalist and MTB Olympian.
Once asked to describe herself in three words Louise Robinson said: ''I'm from Yorkshire''.


great info, Nuke, fair play. He was an interesting character, no doubt. Good on ya for pulling all that together.
 

nuke terrorist

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Henry Anglade (6 July 1933 - 10 November 2022)
Anglade was one of France's best Tour riders in the Anquetil era.
A pro from 1957-67, Anglade's best year was 1959 when he finished as Tour runner up to Bahamontes (plus a stage win). During the race the French national team refused to help Anglade who was riding for the regional Centre-Midi team. Anglade also won the 1959 Dauphine and French road champs. This made him the inaugural winner of Super Prestige Pernod i.e. the world no. 1 for 1959 (Roche was the last winner, after a ban on alcohol advertising in France).
Anglade led the French national team in the 1960 Tour but only finished 8th after his team mate Roger Riviere (1936-1976) attacked on stage 6. On stage 14 while in 2nd place, Rivere suffered a crash that left him paralysed after following winner Gastone Nencini on a descent.
Anglade was 4th in both the 1964-65 Tours and French champion again in 1965.
He finished his career at Mercier working for Poulidor. Anglade is also remembered for his unflattering nickname - 'Napoleon'.

As well as being a French cycling icon of his era, Henry later became a stained glass window maker (see picture on his English wikipedia page is unusually much longer than the French article).

 

rettucs

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was book shopping this morning. I picked up Dan Martin's book with every intention to buy it but when I flicked through it looked like it was along the lines of, I did this race, then that race, then the other race.

I liked Dan as a rider and he seemed a decent bloke, but there was nothing remotely interesting or unique about him as a person that would make me want to read his book.

Jan Ullrich, on the other hand. I bought his autobiography and cannot wait to get stuck in. Arguably my favourite rider of all time, and definitely one of the most interesting off-the-bike characters.
 

nuke terrorist

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was book shopping this morning. I picked up Dan Martin's book with every intention to buy it but when I flicked through it looked like it was along the lines of, I did this race, then that race, then the other race.

I liked Dan as a rider and he seemed a decent bloke, but there was nothing remotely interesting or unique about him as a person that would make me want to read his book.

Jan Ullrich, on the other hand. I bought his autobiography and cannot wait to get stuck in. Arguably my favourite rider of all time, and definitely one of the most interesting off-the-bike characters.
Dan's race diaries weren't too exciting.

I remember the time Jan Ullrich sued the management company of Team Coast his team 2003 which went bust mid season. the case came up a few years later Jan was owed about a few 100k
The company were using doping allegations to avoid paying out and the judge warned Herr Ullrich before he testified that there was a mandatory one year ban for perjury. Jan of course denied doping.
outside the court after he won the case, Jan said he didn't expect to get the money as the team manager was skint. he immediately sued Ullrich for libel!
 

nuke terrorist

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Just heard German anti doping campaigner Prof. Werner Franke has died suddenly aged 82.
He often commented on doping in German cycling and especially Jan Ullrich.
 

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After Davide Rebellin another major death in Italy...

Ercole Baldini (1933 - 1 December 2022)
1958 Giro winner, 1958 world RR champ, 1956 Olympic RR champ, world hour record and pursuit world champ (both 1956) and twice Italian RR champion.

Baldini was one of the outstanding TT riders of Anquetil's era and won the Gran Prix des Nations in 1960 (which until the 90s was a basically the TT world champs).
Despite a superb amateur career and brilliant start to his pro career, Baldini didn't fulfil his potential (Coppi comparisons) and after the 50s big wins were rare.
He won 5 Giro stages (inc 3 TTs) and one mountain Tour stage in 1959 into Italy.
After 3rd (1957) and victory in 1958 the best Baldini could manage in the Giro was 7th in 1962.
His best Tour finishes were 6th (1959) and 8th in 1962.
During his career Baldini suffered press jibes for being out of shape. After retiring in 1964 Baldini became a farmer.

 

rettucs

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Post of the week winner: 22nd March, 2013
After Davide Rebellin another major death in Italy...

Ercole Baldini (1933 - 1 December 2022)
1958 Giro winner, 1958 world RR champ, 1956 Olympic RR champ, world hour record and pursuit world champ (both 1956) and twice Italian RR champion.

Baldini was one of the outstanding TT riders of Anquetil's era and won the Gran Prix des Nations in 1960 (which until the 90s was a basically the TT world champs).
Despite a superb amateur career and brilliant start to his pro career, Baldini didn't fulfil his potential (Coppi comparisons) and after the 50s big wins were rare.
He won 5 Giro stages (inc 3 TTs) and one mountain Tour stage in 1959 into Italy.
After 3rd (1957) and victory in 1958 the best Baldini could manage in the Giro was 7th in 1962.
His best Tour finishes were 6th (1959) and 8th in 1962.
During his career Baldini suffered press jibes for being out of shape. After retiring in 1964 Baldini became a farmer.

I saw Herbie Sykes posting about this. At least he was a good age, not like poor Rebellin.

RIP to them both.
 

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Walter Beneteau (1972 - 2022) has died in Bali.
Beneteau was a pro with Jean-Rene Bernaudeau's Bonjour/Brioches/Bouygues squad and rode 9 grand tours finishing them all inc. 7 Tours 2000-06 (best GC 42nd in 2001).
He finished 5th on the stage Simoni won in the 2002 Tour just 10 seconds behind.

I was at the peak of my interest in pro cycling in the early 2000s and was a big fan of Bernaudeau's team.
Although I remember Beneteau being a stalwart of the squad, I don't have any clear memories of him.
So many guys have solid careers like Walter did, but get lost in the crowd.
 
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nuke terrorist

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Walter Beneteau (1972 - 2022) has died in Bali.
Beneteau was a pro with Jean-Rene Bernaudeau's Bonjour/Brioches/Bouygues squad and rode 9 grand tours finishing them all inc. 7 Tours 2000-06 (best GC 42nd in 2001).
He finished 5th on the stage Simoni won in the 2002 Tour just 10 seconds behind.

I was at the peak of my interest in pro cycling in the early 2000s and was a big fan of Bernaudeau's team.
Although I remember Beneteau being a stalwart of the squad, I don't have any clear memories of him.
So many guys have solid careers like Walter did, but get lost in the crowd.
 

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Vittorio Adorni (1937 - 24 December 2022)
1965 Giro winner and 1968 World Champion was a giant of Italian cycling in the 1960s.
His Giro win was assisted by neo pro team mate Felice Gimondi (3rd on GC) who won the Tour shortly after.
Adorni won 11 Giro stages and was runner up twice in 1964 and in 1968 to his Faema team mate Merckx.
After retiring in 1970 Adorni remained heavily involved in sport in many roles inc as a DS and a UCI administrator.

 

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Noel Dejonckheere (1955 - 29 December 2022)
I remember him being a DS w/ Jim Ochowicz's teams but didn't know he was a good sprinter winning six Vuelta stages and many other races.
Dejonckheere spent all of his pro career (1979-88) at Spanish squads (mostly Teka) apart from one season at Gis in Italy in 1982. Noel was ill for some time.
 

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Never heard of this guy...
Henri De Wolf (1936 -12/1/2023)
Fleche Wallonne winner 1962 and Vuelta stage winner in 1964.
De Wolf was a pro from 1959-69 and rode 8 grand tours inc. the Tour four times.
 

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Just heard about about Lieuwe Westra - only 40...

Lieuwe Westra (1982 - 14 January 2023)
A powerful rouleur and TT specialist, Lieuwe made his name with Vanconsoleil, a team full of have a go heroes who despite the team's low budget took many a good win and launched the careers of many fine riders.
Westra then moved on to Astana, riding on the 2014 Tour winning team with Nibali.
His career wins included two Dutch TT championships, GC victories in the Tour of Denmark, 3 Days of de Panne, Tour of Picardie and stage wins at the Dauphine, Paris-Nice (on his way to 2nd on GC), Catalunya, California and Belgium.
Westra signed for Wanty for 2017 but retired in January before the season began later citing depression.

Westra's riding for Nibali on the pave stage 5 of the 2014 Tour to Arenberg earned him the combatif prize.
Lars Boom (Belkin) won the stage in rotten weather and 3rd place on the day for Nibali set him up for victory before the race got near the Alps. After riding for Nibali all day, Westra was only dropped near the end when Astana had 3 of 4 riders at the front of the race.

 

rettucs

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Just heard about about Lieuwe Westra - only 40...

Lieuwe Westra (1982 - 14 January 2023)
A powerful rouleur and TT specialist, Lieuwe made his name with Vanconsoleil, a team full of have a go heroes who despite the team's low budget took many a good win and launched the careers of many fine riders.
Westra then moved on to Astana, riding on the 2014 Tour winning team with Nibali.
His career wins included two Dutch TT championships, GC victories in the Tour of Denmark, 3 Days of de Panne, Tour of Picardie and stage wins at the Dauphine, Paris-Nice (on his way to 2nd on GC), Catalunya, California and Belgium.
Westra signed for Wanty for 2017 but retired in January before the season began later citing depression.

Westra's riding for Nibali on the pave stage 5 of the 2014 Tour to Arenberg earned him the combatif prize.
Lars Boom (Belkin) won the stage in rotten weather and 3rd place on the day for Nibali set him up for victory before the race got near the Alps. After riding for Nibali all day, Westra was only dropped near the end when Astana had 3 of 4 riders at the front of the race.

this is sad. Very much sounds like he took his own life. Depression is so prevalent throughout professional cycling.
 

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this is sad. Very much sounds like he took his own life. Depression is so prevalent throughout professional cycling.
Westra's dead?? Jesus.
Man. That's horrible.

I remember he looked really nice TTing. He had that Jan Ulrich kind of elegant diesel engine thing going on.
 

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... I visited him in a car garage on the industrial estate of Zwaagdijk in North Holland," Sijtsma wrote. "He had spent the night on the loft of the garage. The mat Westra had slept on that night was still on the floor. A blanket for the cold lay next to it. It was a sad sight. Beastly.

"When asked if he wanted help with his addictions, he replied in the negative. What did it all matter anyway? He had always listened to others, always done what they asked him to do. He was done with that, now he went his own way.

Utterly heartbreaking.
If the UCI wanted to ever do anything positive for riders, as oposed to being a waste of space, they could stand to put something in place to help ex pros. The standard quote from cycling is that *everyone* in the sport is damaged, it's just a matter of how damaged. Cycling is not like normal sports in this regard.
 

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