The European New Right (1 Viewer)

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These popped up briefly in the Russia thread last week and I picked up two books by authors associated with the movement. I was gonna just do 'What book did you read last night' post but hey, everyone likes a new thread.
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Written by the fresh new face of the European New Right, it's not so much a book as an angry polemic against the EU. Nothing wrong with having a go at the EU but he never progresses beyond what they are doing wrong to how it can be put right.
His first work 'Generation Identity' sets out the purpose of the Identity movement; to get rid of the 68ers and restore Europe to its former glory.

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This by the founder of the ENR. Rather better than the above, it's ideas are more fully fleshed out and developed and it manages to strike the right balance between ranting and overly academic.

There's a lot of appealing ideas in both however. While the term New Right suggests a neo-Nazism of sorts and they have some 'interesting' ideas with regard to race, a lot of their ideas could equally be considered left wing.
De Benoist is probably right in refusing to accept the 'New Right' tag but its one that has stuck. The theory is a mishmash of ideas from both sides and I suppose it proves the ultimate uselessness of the left/right divide today.
Broadly speaking the movement is concentrated in Western continental Europe so France, Germany, Austria etc.
Its intellectual foundations are in the French GRECE (Research Group for the Study of European Civilisation) group which aimed to "revive and redefine certain political and cultural ideas which had been discredited since 1945 as a result of their supposed association with the Fascist movements of that era".
The latest iteration, Generation Identitaire, is very much focused on the Islamification of Europe - it launched itself into the public eye by protesting the construction of a mosque in Poitiers, site of the Battle of Tours which seen Charles Martel defeat an invading Islamic army while more recently they blockaded a bridge in Calais in protest at continued migration. Bloc Identitaire seems to be the parent group for Generation, they are not hugely dissimilar, both protest the destruction of European civilisation, whether at the hands of Muslim hordes or American cultural influence.
There is some differentiation within the New Right when it comes to religion - originally it was very much in favour of paganism, viewing Christianity as non-European. It has however come to accept the influence that Judeo-Chrstianity has had on Europe over the past 2,000 years.

Anyway, the above is a bit all over the place and I'm not sure there can be any response to all that but hopefully someone learns something.

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(Easy on the Fascist overtones there lads).
 

тхеодоре кацзынски

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what's with the symbol? bang of stormfront off it

Yeah, its a strange one. They seem to be at pains to differentiate themselves from Fascism and yet are happy to stick that on the front of their books. Trying to keep the cover hidden makes for some awkward moments. I guess it harkens back to the paganism they're so fond of.
 

kthozoid

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Good idea to set up a separate thread for this. As we were discussing elsewhere, much of the new European Right/alt-right/3rd-4th position stuff merely recruits left-wing imagery or rhetoric, depending on the context, to advance essentially nationalist-chauvinist ideas. In such situations to call to 'move beyond left and right' is in essence simply a call to just move right. Whilst it may avow an anti-capitalist component in rhetoric, in practise it's anti-proletarian, and such movements initially find themselves as tools of the bourgeois establishment to break up left-wing solidarity but ultimately progress beyond that and threaten to devour their masters. With popular discontent at the present state of neo-liberalism and capitalism in constant increase there's much fertile ground for this kind of dissembling. Not is much of the rhetoric new. The apparent support that these new-rightist have for third world liberation movements tends to give them the appearance of a left-wing hue yet is actually a result of their ethnopluralism, a modernised version of segregationism, nativism and anti-immigration. And of course, it's not exclusive to western Europe at all, but is gaining ground in the US and eastern Europe where many fellow travellers are sitting in the Ukrainian Rada, (sort of non-Duginst Duginists !!) despite being at odds with others of their ilk.
 

тхеодоре кацзынски

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Nice one. As you say they frame much of their racialist rhetoric as segregationist; foreigners are grand, just not over here. I'll have to keep reading on them, they're an interesting bunch to say the least and while small in number seem to have influenced more popular rightist groups.
 

kthozoid

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Yes, they sort of imitate the professional cadres of the Bolshevik model, another appropriation from the left. (Apologies for my usual typo-riddled post. I only ever notice those things about 10 seconds past the time limit for editing ;) )
 

kthozoid

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Aren't these the groups that Putin supports because they weaken the EU?
Pegida and whatnot
To a large extent yes, many far-right National Conservatives and fellow travellers in the west such as FN, AfD etc get backing from the Kremlin. The more overtly Nazi groups in Ukraine and the Baltics are NATO backed. Interesting to see that even the right-wing can have its schisms.
 

kthozoid

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Not sure about PEGIDA though. The BND (secret service) in Germany might also be involved. There have been some very murky dealings within the German Military Intelligence in the past (and the present) where extreme right-wing groups have been concerned. Also, the far right is not monolithic here in Germany. The AfD, for example, are pro-Russian. But whilst im not sure about the even more extreme NPD, who are overt neo Nazis, many of their foot-soldiers have seen action alongside the Galician paramilitaries in Ukraine against the Russians. I've seen NPD boneheads here in Berlin with Azov Battalion t-shirts and paraphernalia.
 

kthozoid

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There's plenty of evidence for it, as Yatesnyuk's Patriotic Front party absorbed a lot of the neo-Nazi activists from Svoboda and Praviy Sektor into his ruling party. There's also strong evidence that the sniper massacre was carried out by members of these groups. In addition the Azov, Aidar and other battalions have received NATO training.
 

Lili Marlene

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The Express though, srsly when we're talking about can we trust people?
 

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