The Cooking Thread (1 Viewer)

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jonah

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the new Meera Sodha book (East) has loads of great recipes in it.

But my absolute favourite meal at the moment is a Quorn Southern Fried Bite sandwich. White crusty bread, mix of mayo and sriracha for the sauce, bit of lettuce, tomato and maybe thinly sliced red onion or gherkin and then some bites sliced in half. Heaven. Also works with smoked tofu dry fried on a griddle pan.

I haven't tried the Quorn bites, but those Tofoo ones are pretty good. Or sometimes I just do a batter/bread and bake some tofu for the same vibe, and douse in franks and bbq. Mayo is the devil to me, but otherwise this sandwich sounds great

Will also check out Meera Sodha's book!
 

jonah

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I would like to give sourdough a go at some point, but am def not confident of my baking skills
 

jonah

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True, but with dwindling baking supplies and yeast as rare as gold...
 

flashback

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I'm not sure if it's mentioned in here before, but people talk a load of wank about knives and let perfect get in the way of good.

If you're working in kitchens, chopping day in day out, you're probably going to be using a 10 inch Fibrox Victorinox Chef's knife to do almost everything.

You can pick these up for about 40 bucks or something, mine was being thrown out by one of the guys I used to work with so I just took it. He was throwing it away because it was more than 10 years old, and I've used it daily for about 20 years, it's still grand.

That knife, a steel, a cheap paring knife, along with a decent chopping board, will do you. You don't need to buy fancy knives, or loads of them.

You can pick up a waterstone for around the same price to keep them sharp.
 

ann post

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I'm not sure if it's mentioned in here before, but people talk a load of wank about knives and let perfect get in the way of good.

If you're working in kitchens, chopping day in day out, you're probably going to be using a 10 inch Fibrox Victorinox Chef's knife to do almost everything.

You can pick these up for about 40 bucks or something, mine was being thrown out by one of the guys I used to work with so I just took it. He was throwing it away because it was more than 10 years old, and I've used it daily for about 20 years, it's still grand.

That knife, a steel, a cheap paring knife, along with a decent chopping board, will do you. You don't need to buy fancy knives, or loads of them.

You can pick up a waterstone for around the same price to keep them sharp.

Ah but they have three hundred euro ceramic sets now in IKEA grey. They can't possibly be bad.
 

ann post

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Aye. Ceramic knives are the definition of a solution to a problem that didn't need to be solved.

I remember ceramics creeping into brakes on cars - temperature resistance being the thing. I wonder is it essentially the same food chain, like the steel-ceramic plants that were doing the brakes seeing another market in all those well to do roaming F1 fans. I'll probably end up having to read about this at 2am in time for the early shift tomo.
 

flashback

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I remember ceramics creeping into brakes on cars - temperature resistance being the thing. I wonder is it essentially the same food chain, like the steel-ceramic plants that were doing the brakes seeing another market in all those well to do roaming F1 fans. I'll probably end up having to read about this at 2am in time for the early shift tomo.
intuitively you'd think ceramic would have no place in brakes?
Like, it's really hard, meaning it would just slide over stuff, or carve scratches into if it's embedded in other stuff. Interesting.

I heard there was some business with carbon being used in brakes, even rotors made out of carbon? I don't think they work until they're three digit degrees Celsius though. Handy enough once you've got everything up to temp and you're coming out the tunnel in Monaco at around 200 miles an hour, but probably less useful if you need to slow down to avoid the artic that just pulled in front of you.
 

Cornu Ammonis

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I know ceramic blades touted as being the next big thing in histology as they stay sharper for longer so you replace them less but I don't think they took off really. Plus it makes more sense when you're cutting things to be a few microns thick than your chicken fillet for a curry.
 

magicbastarder

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i learned a while back that there's quite an active kitchen knife and knife sharpening ecosystem on youtube. often young american men who are inordinately proud of how sharp they can get their knives. i am unsure of their actual level of cooking skills though.
 

flashback

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i learned a while back that there's quite an active kitchen knife and knife sharpening ecosystem on youtube. often young american men who are inordinately proud of how sharp they can get their knives. i am unsure of their actual level of cooking skills though.

Knife sharpening is pretty satisfying stuff in their (our?) defense. I was sharpening friend's knives at one point, but not so much these days...
 

flashback

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I know ceramic blades touted as being the next big thing in histology as they stay sharper for longer so you replace them less but I don't think they took off really. Plus it makes more sense when you're cutting things to be a few microns thick than your chicken fillet for a curry.

So they stopped using glass? I never did histology much, I thought the broken glass blades were cool though.
 

flashback

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I’ve never used anything apart from stainless steel - vibratome and crytome. I’m not really a histology guy though.

Oh yeah? Huh. Now I'm doubting my memory. I seem to remember like... snapping a piece of glass, and there'd be this edge, like the tail of an exponentially increasing plot say, and that edge would be really sharp and you'd put it into a clamp yoke, and use it to do your slices...

Hm. I'm having trouble believing I'd make something this involved up... yet I'm not sure exactly when I'd have done anything like this. Maybe 4th year undergrad? No idea.
 

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