Steve Jobs Legacy (1 Viewer)

Mormon Nailer

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So. What will it be?

On the one hand I remember the complete scepticism the iPod was greeted with, and now digital music is the norm. So did Steve Jobs digify the world and open the door for digital media of all kinds, from music to film to books. And did this destroy the internet by making it something you consume rather than engage with? Was the move from BBSs and weird little individual hobby websites with blinking fonts to Hulu and other passive streaming forms of the internet (even Facebook is pretty passive) inevitable or did the iPod and the digitisation of music the first step.

Was the best thing he ever did robbing the WIMP environment and mass marketing it?

Will his most lasting legacy be the idea like a company like Apple can ask for a 20% cut, Tony Soprano style of everything that happens in their environment and expect people, to comply? And a related point will locked off ecosystems like the iPhones become the norm? A computer will no longer be something you programme yourself or tinker with and programmes are now apps and just another form of entertainment?
 

thumped

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We had a look at a Samsung Galaxy Tab in work a while ago. After playing with it for an hour or so, someone said "yeah it's nice alright, but i'd really need to read the manual first to get the best out of it".

Jobs's true lasting legacy will be how much he did to move consumer electronics away from that. My 3 year old uses an iPad.
 

Scientician 0.8

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MP3 players existed for nearly five years before the first iPod was released but iPod was the product that caught people's imagination, and simplified the concepts enough to make digital music a truly mass market phenomenon. It does seem that locked in media appliances are becoming more and more common, which I think is sad. In tandem with facebook, iPads etc. seem to be against the supervening spirit of the internet. However, for most people, the litmus test is whether the thing is fun, and does, simply, what they want it to do. I suppose what Apple has done is turn IT finally into something like a washing machine, or a kettle, or a microwave. We don't get annoyed that we can't install Linux on our fridge (well maybe some people do shit like that I dunno) and I think that bringing that attitude to computing will be a lasting legacy of the last decade of Apple.
 

ann post

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It does seem that locked in media appliances are becoming more and more common, which I think is sad. In tandem with facebook, iPads etc. seem to be against the supervening spirit of the internet. However, for most people, the litmus test is whether the thing is fun, and does, simply, what they want it to do. I suppose what Apple has done is turn IT finally into something like a washing machine, or a kettle, or a microwave. We don't get annoyed that we can't install Linux on our fridge (well maybe some people do shit like that I dunno) and I think that bringing that attitude to computing will be a lasting legacy of the last decade of Apple.

that sorta is coming from the wrong angle in my head. nothing was as locked in as vynil and cd, at least you could bust the tabs on cassette. you can wreck and ipods head and make it play tetris and billion other things. the older devices were more like fridges than the new ones.
 

Scientician 0.8

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that sorta is coming from the wrong angle in my head. nothing was as locked in as vynil and cd, at least you could bust the tabs on cassette. you can wreck and ipods head and make it play tetris and billion other things. the older devices were more like fridges than the new ones.

I'm talking about computers, not music listening technologies in particular though. Anyway, you can give a (non-DRM) cd to anyone and they can copy it, same with vinyl, and cassette. There have been numerous attempts to lock in digital music. You can of course reprogramme an iPod, but really who does that? As I said there are probably people who install Linux on their washing machine, but it's only ever gonna be a minority thing. Cars are a decent analogy, modern cars are built so that you can't tinker with them as much, however they're more reliable than they ever were so you have less reason to. Again, for most people, stuff being locked-in is never going to be an issue.
 

7 - No tomorrow

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For me the locked in part comes into play with iTunes. It is first and foremost a cash cow for Apple. It is infuriatingly non-user friendly. Hard drive crashes and you only have your songs on your iPod? Fuck you. Wanna take songs from your work computer and put them on your iPod? Tough shit. Every other player on the market is a portable external HD. The idea of him being some iconoclastic altruist doesn't ring true to me. I love my iPod, I fucking HATE iTunes.
 

Mormon Nailer

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It does seem that locked in media appliances are becoming more and more common, which I think is sad. In tandem with facebook, iPads etc. seem to be against the supervening spirit of the internet.

I think there is a distinct possibility that our children will look at our notion that the internet was about sharing, creating and producing as a quaint one, as by that time the whole thing will be throttled and sanitised and converted into nothing more than TV on demand.
 

7 - No tomorrow

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I think there is a distinct possibility that our children will look at our notion that the internet was about sharing, creating and producing as a quaint one, as by that time the whole thing will be throttled and sanitised and converted into nothing more than TV on demand.

I don't have kids.

Precisely for this reason.
 

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