Silicon Valley (1 Viewer)

rettucs

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the last episode was amazing.

It took me a while to start liking this show, but I ended up loving it. I need to rewatch those early episodes again, ones I haven't seen since before I decided I like it.
 

east hastings

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First two episodes of the new season were bit hit and miss but 3rd episode was brilliant. That new billionaire character is brilliant
 

tim

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That guy is hilarious.

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THought the first episode was great. Second ok. THird one great.

ANd I assume everyone recognised the lawyer as Ginsberg from Mad Men. THe accent totally threw me in the first season.

New guy is hilarious indeed. I love his "THis fucking guy" shtick when he's challenged.
 

7 - No tomorrow

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Good read from Alex P on Silicon Valley and Halt & Catch Fire, but also tech in culture

Start-up Costs: ‘Silicon Valley,’ ‘Halt and Catch Fire,’ and How Microserfdom Ate the World «

And on Douglas Coupland's Microserfs

The notion that cutting the corporate cord to work for a start-up often just means busting out of a cubicle in order to shackle oneself to a laptop in a slightly funkier room goes unexamined; the possibility that work within a capitalist system, no matter how creative and freeform and unlike what your parents did, might be fundamentally incompatible with self-actualization and spiritual fulfillment is not on the table.

This, to paraphrase Portlandia, is one of the dreams of the ’90s — that our work selves and our true natures could be one and the same.

On early, pre-VF Palo Alto

From across a cultural divide, the nerds from Redmond regard the breezily profligate supernerds of Palo Alto with a mix of envy and horror: “They’re immune to money. They just sort of assume it’ll appear like rain.” With Steve Jobs in exile and the Web’s billionaire boys’ club still a few years away, the Valley in the book is “a bland anarchy,” a kingdom “with a thousand princes but no kings.” A few of those princes, of course, will grow up. They’ll disrupt industries for disruption’s sake, tank the economy at least once, vigorously defend their right to treat employees like contractors, and turn a new generation of coder-dreamers into serfs. Coupland’s characters can’t conceive of any of this yet. Capitalism still seems like it can be saved from within; no matter how much it takes over your life, work never seems like work in the traditional sense, as long as there’s a trampoline in the backyard that you can jump on while thinking about God. And that, to coin a phrase, is how they get you.

On The Social Network movie
Adapting Ben Mezrich’s nonfiction book The Accidental Billionaires for the screen as The Social Network, Aaron Sorkin looked at Facebook and saw junior Jacobins preparing to guillotine their social and intellectual betters. The movie is close to perfect as cinema and deeply suspect as commentary. It’s too busy judging Mark Zuckerberg and his motives to reflect on the real spiritual consequences of rampant technologization. Sorkin’s gravestone as a thinking person will have HE READ THE COMMENTS engraved on it; aggrieved by the existence of an Internet where anyone, no matter how uninformed, can just go online and say bad things about Aaron Sorkin, he turns Zuckerberg’s invention of Facebook into the vengeance of a lovelorn loser. In the movie’s last scene, Jesse Eisenberg’s Zuckerberg hits refresh in vain on the friend request that Rooney Mara’s Erica won’t accept, while the soundtrack sticks the Beatles’ “Baby You’re a Rich Man” in his guts like a shiv. The moment reads two ways. Either it’s about Zuckerberg, for all his billions, being Just Like Us — a slave to the same digital toy to which we’ve subcontracted management of our memories, our personal interactions, and our sense of self-worth — or it’s about how Facebook, born of Zuckerberg’s sense of exclusion, has made us just like him. The notion that the tech visionaries whose inventions colonize our daily lives are actually uploading the virus of their personalities to the global unconscious is an idea that floats through The Social Network; it’s the engine that powers Alex Gibney’s forthcoming documentary Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine, which stops just short of postulating that every iPhone includes a fragment of poor angry uncharitable emotionally stunted Steve’s immortal soul, like a sliver of wormwood from Mordor.
 

pissypants

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Last episode of season 2 was great. Love this show. Maybe not as funny as it was in Season 1 but still super entertaining.
 

hugh

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Just finished Season One of this. Brilliant. I didn't realise there was a S2 until I looked at this thread. Yess!
 

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