Nobody likes non-heavy rock music anymore (1 Viewer)

egg_

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But really like you being you and being the maker of music you are, you'd probably not click on that ad yourself
Heh, dead right there

The only ads I click on are for music software/hardware, and so my FB feed is jam packed with them

But surely at this stage of our lives we understand that just because we wouldn't do something doesn't mean that nobody will do it, right?

AIUI the real value of this sort of thing is training Spotify's algorithm. For the piano stuff I'm spending around 0.11 per stream, but each listener that comes via the ads likes the tune - they listen on average almost 3 times, and 2/3 of them save it. What I'm hoping for is for Spotify to be able to pattern-match the kind of person who likes my shit, and to start suggesting it to people.

Clearly spending 20 quid a week on ads and getting approx zero return is not sustainable, and there may not even be a pattern to the people who like my stuff that can be discerned via machine learning, but ... well, I don't have any other clever marketing ideas, so I'll probably keep going until I get sick of spending
 

egg_

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Release music regular and never dwell on a release, this is how people enjoy music now.
3 Stoat tunes released in the last year, another almost finished. That's about as quick as we can work. Our music is pretty inconsistent style-wise, so we're not really an albums band

(the reason the 4th isn't released yet is because it's basically a glorification of going on the piss, and me and John are both feeling weird about it on account of our old buddy who died from boozing recently)
 

ann post

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Yeah I dunno, this is just capitalism, and I don't mean that glibly, I mean that some people take years to get a good album together and it would be terrible if they released unfinished shit just because Bob Lefsetz says you have to follow this model or whatever. If you're good at this kind of thing then sure but forcing yourself to do something badly and quickly just for the sake of "this is how the market works"... well it's up to you but listeners will notice. Sometimes albums are worth waiting for. If it's just about selling products, and frankly there's a mindset that it is, yeah ok, you're only a fool for working to make your product good and longlasting in that case.

Same with writers, some people can release a book a year and it's fine because usually their writing isn't that good but it's professional enough to pass and they gain meaning through the vast accumulation of work; some writers only write one book every ten years and it's good because every word is slowly carved out. They should be paid 10 times for every one book sold by the other guy but obviously that's not gonna happen.

I suppose under the streaming model quality work should be rewarded by replayablility? A long tail if you will.

I agree with all of this.

I actually finished an album about a year and half ago, and had moment of realisation that releasing it as envisaged would actually murder it - so instead i just released a few tunes off it - now granted this was kinda coupled with a sort of anxiety of being 'out of music' for ages but eh, people are into that stuff more than anything I've ever done - it lead to a fair few collaborations and in the meantime what was initially 'the album' has kinda grown - it might never see a release as envisaged or as longform, but a bunch of people in france and netherlands dig my stuff now I'm pretty certain that going headlong into an album release wouldn't have been half the fun or half the story for the people who got into the stuff. For the record, about 1/3rd of what i thought was 'an album' is already out
 

ann post

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Clearly spending 20 quid a week on ads and getting approx zero return is not sustainable, and there may not even be a pattern to the people who like my stuff that can be discerned via machine learning, but ... well, I don't have any other clever marketing ideas, so I'll probably keep going until I get sick of spending

Play Piano gigs.
 

sleepy

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Yeah I dunno, this is just capitalism, and I don't mean that glibly, I mean that some people take years to get a good album together and it would be terrible if they released unfinished shit just because Bob Lefsetz says you have to follow this model or whatever. If you're good at this kind of thing then sure but forcing yourself to do something badly and quickly just for the sake of "this is how the market works"... well it's up to you but listeners will notice. Sometimes albums are worth waiting for. If it's just about selling products, and frankly there's a mindset that it is, yeah ok, you're only a fool for working to make your product good and longlasting in that case.

Same with writers, some people can release a book a year and it's fine because usually their writing isn't that good but it's professional enough to pass and they gain meaning through the vast accumulation of work; some writers only write one book every ten years and it's good because every word is slowly carved out. They should be paid 10 times for every one book sold by the other guy but obviously that's not gonna happen.

I suppose under the streaming model quality work should be rewarded by replayablility? A long tail if you will.
I don’t think it’s about releasing unfinished shit, I kind of think it’s more about being realistic of people’s attention spans. Releasing a full length album when you’re fairly unknown isn’t a great idea because how many people are going to sit through the whole thing? I think you’re better off doing what @ann post did with his last album, rather than releasing a 40 minute album that people are only going to listen to 20 minutes of at most. I’ve seen a few people release album over the last year or so that have kind of disappeared. Whereas if they’d maybe broken it up into 3 or 4 eps they could have kept a steady momentum going and built up a bit more of a following over time. And then if they want to, repackage all that stuff into a full length album after a couple of months if there’s a demand
 

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