Gardening (1 Viewer)

flashback

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Nice to hear your bees are happy.

It's a good idea to plant things for pollinators. My logic is we've taken a fair amount at this point, and we should put in a bit of effort to keep our insect buddies happy.

You can learn about what pollinators are in your area and what they like. Everyone wins.
 

hermie

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Might try some of these although maybe the best way to help bees is to plant heather.

Got a couple of these last week. Have you tried them?
 

hydromancer

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Not yet am considering shelling out there are plenty of places I could throw them anyway even just into fields.
 

hydromancer

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Mandrake grow kit these are very difficult to grow apparently I have never tried.

 

the_jen

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I got some great plant pots in lidl or aldi a year or two ago, with a reservoir and wick to draw up the water. I've been waiting and waiting for them to come back in, and they haven't, so I made my own a month ago and they work great. A sad, straggly geranium is creating new shoots from its woody-looking stem and a shop-bought basil is flourishing. The plants are much, much, much happier than when they were being watered top-down or sat in a saucer with no wick. I used a cord that was the handle of a free shopping bag, synthetic so it doesn't rot.
 

ann post

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Besides being written in fluent hippie I'm all for this.

TBH our place is largely totally wild and all i'm doing is thinning out the imported trees and replacing them with natives.

Just if you are looking for a spring project or something to go at with the kids or something.

 

magicbastarder

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how much space do you have?
we've a decent sized garden (for the suburbs). putting in a pond was one of the best things we did, especially in terms of kids showing interest; we don't have kids ourselves but the nephews and nieces and kids of friends all love to go pond dipping.
 

ann post

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Too Much.

Effectively I've ended up curator of the remnants of my grandparents farm which is something like 4 acres. 2 of that is already planted native Irish (i didn't do this), the rest is what i'm working on. Pond was built last year, and then failed soon after because we live on limestone, so I think i'm gonna actually buy a pond liner soon enough to start that again. 'helpful' odd job neighbour made a mess of the place a few years ago so basically i just am clearing dead trees (evergreens) for the rest of the year.
 

magicbastarder

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top work. if you've that much space (the reason why i asked) it might be worth buying seed off yer man cafolla, he trades as irish wildflower seeds i think. he doesn't do seed in small batches, only for about half an acre and upwards, but does have specialist seed mixes it's hard to get elsewhere, e.g. native irish woodland seeds etc.
 

hydromancer

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IMG_20200123_094911.jpg

So I got an awesome little spade which I might use this to transplant some saplings from woods that are already a bit over grown and crowded. This should also easily fit into a bike pannier and could even possibly be used as some type of ninja weapon.
 

ann post

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top work. if you've that much space (the reason why i asked) it might be worth buying seed off yer man cafolla, he trades as irish wildflower seeds i think. he doesn't do seed in small batches, only for about half an acre and upwards, but does have specialist seed mixes it's hard to get elsewhere, e.g. native irish woodland seeds etc.
I've a load of wildflower seed I bought last year that i'd essentially forgotten until this post. Irish and pro-bee.
 

flashback

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What’s the difference between a splitting and a felling axe?
One difference is the splitting axe has...emmm, like a more streamlined look to it. If you start your finger at the blade and run it away perpendicular to the blade there's no bumps or anything. It's all smooth, like a wedge.

A felling axe isn't used as a wedge, so this demand isn't there, although sometimes they are pretty sleek. Sometimes they aren't though.

The felling axes are just a classier bit of kit in general. They are lighter, the handles are more thought about. I dunno, you're swinging them in the hand all day, they are something that you covet.

A splitting axe is a wedge on a bit of wood.

edit - when I say lighter and heavier I just realised that means nothing. I felling axe would be the weight of a heavy blacksmiths hammer, like a ball peen hammer say. Something like 2-2.5 pounds. A splitting ax would be more along the lines of the weight of a light sledge, something like 5 pounds.


Here, can anyone answer a question about land, and foresting it over. Let's say I bought a rake of land somewhere out in Culchieville, and I decided I wanted it all forested over with native Irish ethnically pure, blue eyed, not gay trees; would there be grants for that?

I heard at some point Ireland decided it was going to plant a few trees, to try to be less cuntish to the rest of the world or something. Did that actually happen? I'm assuming it involved foresting over pasture? Which would lead me to think there might be grants or help for this sort of thing.

Is this all strictly in my imagination?
 

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flashback

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View attachment 13803

Felling axe in my right hand, splitting axe in my left

Interesting. I've never seen a splitting axe that's so narrow. The one's I've seen were all comparable to say your felling axe there in the length of the blade.

Do you know what the thinking is behind it being so narrow? Or would you consider that to be a normal splitting axe?
It's going to cut down on the weight at least. That's quite a nice one, the ones I saw weren't as nice.

Here, @Cornu Ammonis, there's another type of axe that's more common in Norway, that's almost like a T shape, with the edge of the blade running along the top of the T. They use it for smoothing big chunks of timber if they're building those log ski cabins.

I never saw it in use, but I saw them hung up with their other tools out in the cabins. Lord of the Rings type jobbies, cool AF.
 

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