Coffee (1 Viewer)

Coffee is best enjoyed


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Shaney?

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does anyone roast their own coffee beans? i was reading on coffee faq that roasting and grinding your own ensures much better fresher coffee and that generally coffee is when the beans are 18 hours to 3 or four days old but how can you be sure the beans havent been sitting in a warehouse somewhere for weeks and then sitting on a shelf in the supermarket for weeks?

also, general experiences with roasting and grinding your own - taste? effort? price? etc?

has anyone got one of these?
 

Squiggle

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I haven't tried roasting my own, but freshly grinding it definitely makes for better coffee.

I'm thinking of investing in one of the vacuum coffee makers. Looks like it could be fun and that faq claims that it makes the best coffee.
 
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Shaney?

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are the metal hexagonal coffee makers the same as the vacuum ones? we have one or two of those in the house - they do make lovely coffee but theyre difficult to keep clean. i was going to have a cup from it last week but when i opened it it was full of mould so i didnt bother.

i have one of these handy cafetiere cups:



in dublin i have the red one, i have a dark grey one at home in my parents house and in the past i had one of the blue ones. you can get them for about €7 in arrnots and roches stores. "[FONT=arial,helevetica]the double walled design keeps tea/coffee hot for longer and the unique plunger keeps coffee grinds or tea leaves trapped in the base of the mug."[/FONT]
 
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Shaney?

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hmmm. i had assumed cultivation but now that you mention it that wouldnt really be realistic anywhere except maybe on a coffee plantation
 

Squiggle

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Nope, the hexagonal things are apparently called a "Mocha". They need to be cleaned a lot, I don't like the taste of aluminium off the coffee either. Next time I get one it will be stainless steel.

I got a nice stainless steel double walled french press lately, it keeps the coffee hot for ages. Best coffee related investment ever. Those cafetiere cups are great too, fantastic for loose leaf tea as well. I've got a really nice stainless steel one, like this which I got in Barnies. It's fantastic.

l_103608_f04_000.jpg
 

JohnnyRaz

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does anyone roast their own coffee beans? i was reading on coffee faq that roasting and grinding your own ensures much better fresher coffee and that generally coffee is when the beans are 18 hours to 3 or four days old but how can you be sure the beans havent been sitting in a warehouse somewhere for weeks and then sitting on a shelf in the supermarket for weeks?

also, general experiences with roasting and grinding your own - taste? effort? price? etc?

has anyone got one of these?
my greek flatmate has one of those. the greeks like their coffee strong and gritty by all accounts
 
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Nope, the hexagonal things are apparently called a "Mocha". They need to be cleaned a lot, I don't like the taste of aluminium off the coffee either. Next time I get one it will be stainless steel.

I got a nice stainless steel double walled french press lately, it keeps the coffee hot for ages. Best coffee related investment ever. Those cafetiere cups are great too, fantastic for loose leaf tea as well. I've got a really nice stainless steel one, like this which I got in Barnies. It's fantastic.

View attachment 4633
i thought you wheren't supposed to clean those Mocha coffee brewers??
i have one and was told that yes you can rinse it after use but never scrub it or use soap. also an Italian mate told us that it takes a good 2-3 years of use for it to generate a really decent flavour, seems like a lot of hassle but the taste you get is supposed to be worth it. i suppose its like a good cast iron pan.

we have 3 different sized cafetieres a mocha and a really nice filter thing which the girlfriend got from an old job. it was a combined effort when we moved in together, we like coffee. the filter thing is cool, as the pot is metalic and can be handled while the coffee stays hot inside for hours, think it worth a few bob, but herself robbed it, the gypsy :eek::)
 

Squiggle

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pricey arent they! my colleague bought a coffee grinder for over €300 the other day in the sales. he asked me if he should buy a €300+ coffee grinder or a €700+ coat
And you advised him to spend €300+ on a coffee grinder :rolleyes: It must be quite a grinder.

Yes, they are pricey, that Cona one looks lovely though... and I can imagine that the aroma must be amazing.
 
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Shaney?

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And you advised him to spend €300+ on a coffee grinder :rolleyes: It must be quite a grinder.

Yes, they are pricey, that Cona one looks lovely though... and I can imagine that the aroma must be amazing.
well it was half the price of the coat and more useful.

i was looking at the coffee and health entry on wikipedia the other day - check this out!

Reduced risk of Alzheimer's disease

Several studies comparing moderate coffee drinkers (about 2 cups a day) with light coffee drinkers (less than one cup a day) found that those who drank more coffee were significantly less likely to develop Alzheimer's disease later in life. [2][3]

[edit] Reduced risk of gallstone disease

Drinking caffeinated coffee has been correlated with a lower incidence of gallstones and gallbladder disease in both men[4] and women[5] in two studies performed by the Harvard School of Public Health. A lessened risk was not seen in those who drank decaffeinated coffee.

[edit] Reduced risk of Parkinson's disease

A study comparing heavy coffee drinkers (3.5 cups a day) with non-drinkers found that the coffee drinkers were significantly less likely to contract Parkinson's Disease later in life. [6]. Likewise, a second study found an inverse relationship between the amount of coffee regularly drunk and the likelihood of developing Parkinson's Disease. [7]

[edit] Cognitive performance

Many people drink coffee for its ability to increase short term recall and increase IQ[8].
Likewise, in tests of simple reaction time, choice reaction time, incidental verbal memory, and visuospatial reasoning, participants who regularly drank coffee were found to perform better on all tests, with a positive relationship between test scores and the amount of coffee regularly drunk. Elderly participants were found to have the largest effect associated with regular coffee drinking. [9] Another study found that women over the age of 80 performed significantly better on cognitive tests if they had regularly drunk coffee over their lifetimes. [10]

[edit] Analgesic enhancement

Coffee contains caffeine, which increases the effectiveness of pain killers, especially migraine and headache medications. For this reason some aspirin producers also include a small dose of caffeine in the pill.

[edit] Antidiabetic

Coffee intake may reduce one's risk of diabetes mellitus type 2 by up to half. While this was originally noticed in patients who consumed high amounts (7 cups a day), the relationship was later shown to be linear.[11]

[edit] Antineoplastic

Coffee can also reduce the incidence of cirrhosis of the liver[12] and has been linked to a reduced risk of hepatocellular carcinoma, a primary liver cancer.[13]

[edit] Cardioprotective

Coffee reduces the incidence of heart disease, though whether this is simply because it rids the blood of excess lipids or because of its stimulant effect is unknown.[citation needed]

[edit] Laxative/diuretic

Coffee is also a powerful stimulant for peristalsis and is sometimes considered to prevent constipation; it is also a diuretic. However, coffee can also cause loose bowel movements.
Practitioners in alternative medicine often recommend coffee enemas for "cleansing of the colon" due to its stimulus of peristalsis, although mainstream medicine has not proved any benefits of the practice.

[edit] Antioxidant

Coffee contains the anticancer compound methylpyridinium. This compound is not present in significant amounts in other food materials. Methylpyridinium is not present in raw coffee beans but is formed during the roasting process from trigonelline, which is common in raw coffee beans. It is present in both caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee, and even in instant coffee.[14]

[edit] Prevention of dental caries

The tannins in coffee may reduce the cariogenic potential of foods. In vitro experiments have shown that these polyphenolic compounds may interfere with glucosyltransferase activity of mutans streptococci, which may reduce plaque formation. In rat experiments, tea polyphenols reduced caries. [15]

[edit] Gout

Coffee consumption decreased risk of gout in men over age 40. In a large study of over 45,000 men over a 12-year period, the risk for developing gout in men over 40 was inversely proportional with the amount of coffee consumed.[16]
 

Squiggle

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Coffee is a wonder drink :) I should send that list of benefits to my Mum... she is constantly at my Dad and me about our coffee drinking.
 

Squiggle

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My Mother, who drinks about 15 cups of tea a day, is convinced that coffee is evil.

That said, for about 3 years I was drinking an average of 7 to 10 cups of strong, black, coffee a day. That couldn't have been good for me.
 

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